Hacks Against Corruption – be part of it!

Hacks Against Corruption – be part of it!

Hackathon screenshot

Update: 4 October 2012

We're pleased that 32 problem statements have been submitted for the Hackathon events happening around the world this weekend. The statements address issues as varied as reporting sexual harassment or illegal construction to tools for monitoring climate funds, parliamentarians' assets, and court rulings.

We invite you to browse and comment on all the problem statements in our special Hackathon section.

Web and mobile technologies have blown open the doors of communication – changing the way we live, work and share information.  From 2007 post-election violence in Kenya to the 2010 Haitian earthquake, the unprecedented use of mobile phones and web platforms has proven that innovation can literally save lives. In Haiti, through an emergency SMS number, victims were able to text where they were trapped. This information was then translated and displayed on an Ushahidi crisis map, supporting the coordination of rescue efforts.

The potential of these instruments is huge and largely untapped – they can provide a powerful tool to engage vast numbers of people by giving them readily accessible, easy-to-use  tools to take a stand against corruption. From reporting bribes to information crowd-sourcing, web and mobile technologies allow citizens to voice their concerns and demand public accountability.

And now we’ve got an exciting new way that you can join in this technology revolution. See below.

Technology and transparency in action: an example from Georgia

There are numerous successful examples in the Transparency International movement of how technologies can strengthen the fight against corruption. For example, in Tbilisi, Georgia, we are working to increase the responsiveness and accountability of local government through constructive citizen engagement. As citizens report problems on their street via our special site, a message is automatically sent to the local authority. These reports are mapped to show where problems are worst, and are viewed, tracked and discussed by residents and government representatives. Within 72 hours of launching, the site had already received more than 30,000 views, demonstrating broad interest in and demand for this type of service. To date, two out of every three problems reported on the site have been resolved. The initiative in Tbilisi has been praised by the Mayor’s office, which now features a prominent link to the portal on its own website.

We want to do more of this with your participation and support

This autumn, Transparency International and Random Hacks of Kindness (RHoK) are organising a series of Hackathons in cooperation with several of our chapters from different regions to promote, scale up and integrate innovative and sustainable Information and Communications Technology solutions in the fight against corruption.

Organising these events, we aim to challenge anti-corruption and technology experts to work together and create innovative solutions to corruption challenges.

How can you help?

How can mobile technologies help us in monitoring elections across the world? How can we visualise and structure our research data to engage more people? How can we analyse public data through smart engines, or link databases to shed light on the misuse of public funds? How can we make e-solutions to prove the competitiveness of ethical business behaviour?

Technology alone is not the solution – but it is an essential tool in the worldwide fight against corruption, and one with a potentially tremendous impact. To harness this potential power, we need to act now.

Join us by suggesting problems or by providing your technical expertise in our upcoming global hackathon.

Jakarta, Indonesia

Bogotá, Colombia

Casablanca, Morocco

Moscow, Russia (learn more at Transparency International Russia's website)

Vilnius, Lithuania (learn more at Transparency International Lithuania's website)

Hacks Against Corruption builds on several complementary initiatives, such as the Hackathon being held at the International Anti-Corruption Conference in Brazil this November. Random Hacks of Kindness will also host their annual Global Hackathon from 1-2 December. It takes place in several cities around the world and will now feature anti-corruption problem statements from our global movement.

For any press enquiries please contact press@transparency.org

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