Future Against Corruption Award 2018

Future Against Corruption Award 2018

People between the age of 18 and 35 are invited to submit a short video clip presenting their idea on new ways to fight corruption.

The competition is now closed and no more videos can be submitted. Winners have been announced below!

Winners of the #FutureAgainstCorruption Award 2018

Transparency International is excited to announce the winners of the #FutureAgainstCorruption Award 2018.

In partnership with the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), the competition provided a platform for young people aged 18-35 from all over the world to challenge corruption through their innovative and inspiring ideas.

After ten finalists were chosen from over 200 submissions, voters across the globe signalled their favourite videos by giving a ‘thumbs up’ on our YouTube page. These votes were then combined with those of our judging panel, made up of representatives from Transparency International, BMZ and InsightShare.

The winners are:

  • Gisela Pires Foz de Barros and her initiative for educating Brazilian primary and secondary school students on the dangers of corruption.
  • Siti Julian Tari and Dewi Anggraeni of Indonesia Corruption Watch, whose platform opentender.net identifies public procurement projects with a high risk of corruption.
  • Christopher Khajira and his proposal for Community Resource Centres in Kenya based on HIV Voluntary Counselling and Testing Centres, for those fighting corruption at a grassroots level.

The winners have been invited to join Transparency International and BMZ for the award ceremony in Berlin on Wednesday 12th December 2018.

Thank you to all those who voted, submitted ideas and shared the competition, and to our partners BMZ.

Shortlist announced

We are thrilled to give you the top ten of this years Future Against Corruption competition. See the shortlisted ideas here!

 

 

How can I vote?

In this second round, voting is open until 23:59 on Wednesday, 21 November. You can vote for your three favourite videos among the shortlisted ten by clicking on the like button under each video. Please note that the vote of the general public will make up 50% of the final vote. The other 50% will consist of the award committee and the selection of their top three choices.

Learn more about the Future Against Corruption Award 2018

Since 1993, Transparency International (TI) has been leading the fight against corruption worldwide, working in more than 100 countries as part of a broader global movement. What TI’s work has consistently proven is that corruption can be challenged.

TI is calling on young people across the globe to join the anti-corruption movement and be a source of inspiration in the fight against corruption. The innovative drive of young people advocating for fairer and more equal societies around the world can be a huge asset to our growing movement. Now is the time to end corruption.

In light of Transparency International’s 25th anniversary and the International Anti-Corruption Day on 9th December 2018, TI is collaborating with the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) to honour young people from all over the world who challenge corruption through their innovative and inspiring ideas.

People between the age of 18 and 35 are invited to submit a short video clip presenting their idea on new ways to fight corruption.

The FutureAgainstCorruption Award may be conferred to activists from all walks of life. Three Finalists will be selected out of the submitted entries by the general public as well as the FutureAgainstCorruption Award Committee. In choosing the recipients, the need to recognise efforts in diverse fields of civil society and the acknowledgement of anti-corruption initiatives throughout the world will be taken into consideration. The competition will consist of two entry streams: Global and Africa. Two Award recipients will be selected from the global stream and one from the African stream.

The three finalists will be invited to Berlin during the International Anti-Corruption Day festivities to be awarded with the FutureAgainstCorruption Award and to participate at a public ceremony, hosted by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development and Transparency International. They will have the opportunity to present and discuss their ideas with anti-corruption experts from the German government, Transparency International and representatives from anti-corruption organisations and the media.

The competition winner will also have the chance to discuss with the relevant National Chapter and the local German Cooperation office about ways of putting into practice the ideas featured in the winning video entry.

Award Committee Members

The FutureAgainstCorruption Award Committee will consist of five members from the German Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development and Transparency International.

Timeline

1.10.18 – Competition opens to video clip entries

30.10.18 - Deadline for the submission of video entries

7.11.18 - Selection of the top 10 entries by Award Committee

9.11.18 - Posting of the top 10 videos on Youtube for general public to vote on

21.11.18 - Top 3 competition entries (1 – Africa, 2 – Global) identified by general public vote and Award Committee

Selection Criteria

The Committee will use the following criteria to assess eligible nominations:

IMPACT

  • Recipients demonstrate that fighting corruption is possible and can have an impact on society and public good.
  • Recipients should be working in a country or region in which open society is at risk, and their anti-corruption work should strive to ensure that society does not falter.

COURAGE

  • The action must be particularly exemplary, inspirational and deserving of wide international recognition.
  • The recipient should be recognised for the potential or actual risks of their anti-corruption work. 
  • The action should attract interest and emulation in other parts of the world.

SUSTAINABILITY

  • The action should recognise the longevity of commitment to fighting corruption.
  • The action contributes to the durability and strength of the anti-corruption effort. 

Please note that the selection criteria are based on the content of the video, not on the resolution or video graphic quality.

Eligibility

Participants must meet the following requirements:

  • Eligible participants must be above the age of 18 and under the age of 35.
  • Be available to travel to Berlin during the week of the International Anti-Corruption Day (9 December – 11 December 2018)
  • The idea should be one likely to attract interest and emulation in other parts of the world, particularly those with existing levels of corruption.
  • The action must be particularly exemplary, inspirational and deserving of wide international recognition.

Ineligible Participants

The following categories of participants will not be considered for the FutureAgainstCorruption Award:

  • Individuals or organisations of questionable integrity or goals.
  • Members of the TI Board of Directors, the Boards of TI chapters, the Award Committee and salaried staff of the TI Secretariat and of chapters while serving in those capacities.
  • Individuals below the age of 18.
  • Individuals above the age of 35.

How to apply

Interested individuals should upload their innovative idea against corruption in the form of a short video clip (maximum 60 seconds) on their individual Youtube channel and in addition, send an email to FAC@transparency.org with the following information:

  • Name of Participant
  • Country of Residence
  • Year of Birth
  • Scan of ID/Passport
  • Email address
  • Link to video on Youtube

The deadline for submission is 30 October 2018.

For any press enquiries please contact press@transparency.org

Latest

Support Transparency International

Support Us

Power for Nigeria’s people

Bribery in electricity supply ruins livelihoods, but Nigeria’s residents are speaking out.

The terrible consequences of police corruption in South Africa

What do we do when those mandated to protect us are serving other interests than public safety and security? In South Africa, police corruption leaves the public exposed to high rates of crime, and causes distrust of the police service while allowing crime to flourish.

Why do DRC citizens report such high levels of corruption?

People's experiences with corruption in the DRC are far worse than in most other African countries. Why is corruption so prevalent in the DRC, why is bribery so commonplace and why do two thirds of citizens feel powerless?

Three ways to stop money laundering through real estate

Around the world, buying property is a favourite method for the corrupt to launder their ill-gotten gains. However, there are concrete measures that make it significantly more difficult for the corrupt to stash their dirty money in real estate.

Announcing the theme for the 19th edition of the International Anti-Corruption Conference (IACC)

Designing 2030: Truth, Trust & Transparency

Protecting Africa’s wildlife from corruption

When they deliberate over amendments to the global wildlife trade regime, CoP18 must address impunity for illegal timber trafficking in Africa as a matter of high priority.

How the US can help Mongolia get to grips with corruption

A series of bi-lateral meetings and a proposed trade agreement present an opportunity for the US to promote rule of law and an independent judiciary in Mongolia.

Blood diamonds and land corruption in Sierra Leone

A community in Sierra Leone has created powerful short videos documenting their experiences of corruption, forced evictions and a botched resettlement programme at the hands of a multinational diamond mining company.

Countries must be more transparent when investigating transnational corruption

Supervisory and justice systems should be transparent and accountable so that the public can assess their performance.

Resilient institutions

Reducing corruption is an important component of the sustainable development agenda, and one that all state parties have an obligation to address. Although corruption is often thought of as a ‘third-world problem’, institutions in the Global North play an important role in the corruption cycle, and are therefore an essential part of the solutions.

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media