FIFA must do more to win back trust of football fans

FIFA must do more to win back trust of football fans

It’s been one year since Gianni Infantino was elected president of FIFA, world football’s governing body. The new president promised to win back the trust of football fans and reform FIFA, which had become a worldwide symbol of corruption following years of scandals and the dawn raid arrests of its senior officials in Zurich in 2015.

Transparency International and Forza Football, a football fan opinion platform with more than 3 million subscribers, just completed a snap survey of 25,000 fans from over 50 countries to find out what they think.

The message to Infantino is that more needs to be done: 53 per cent of fans still have no confidence in FIFA and only a quarter of fans globally think that Infantino has restored trust in FIFA.

This is better than in the days when former President Sepp Blatter was in charge; our poll in 2016 showed that 69 per cent of fans had no confidence in FIFA.

This year fans in Chile, Germany and the Netherlands are the most disenchanted, closely followed by fans in Ireland, Spain and the UK.

FIFA poll graphic 1 (map)

Here are more highlights from the poll:

FIFA’s reform agenda

On 26 February FIFA President Gianni Infantino wrote an open letter about his progress. He admitted there was more to do and referred to a 50-page FIFA 2.0 reform road map.

The road map emphasises introducing stronger compliance mechanism at FIFA’s 211 member associations in order for them to use the US$1.25 million a year they receive from FIFA.

The next step is monitoring and evaluation. Transparency International has advocated independent oversight for FIFA. To win back trust, FIFA will need outsiders to verify proper conduct and give it the stamp of approval.

FIFA Infantino trust graphic

Country highlights: 38 per cent of Italians, 32 per cent of Colombians, and 31 per cent of Thais voted YES. 71 per cent of Dutch, 66 per cent of Germans, and 60 per cent of Austrians voted NO. 58 per cent of British and 45 per cent of US fans said that they do not think Infantino has restored faith.

FIFA fighting corruption graphic

Country highlights: 70 per cent of Germans, 65 per cent of Austrians, and 63 per cent of French do not feel that FIFA is actively working against corruption. 55 per cent of British and 45 per cent of US also voted NO. But 50 per cent of Thais, 47 per cent of South Africans, and 44 per cent of Costa Ricans believe that the organisation is doing enough.

Last year’s Transparency International and Forza Football survey found that 69 per cent of fans across the world didn’t have confidence in FIFA. This shows that, following the departure of Sepp Blatter, fewer fans distrust the organisation. But the fact that over half the fans still lack confidence in FIFA signifies there is much work to be done.

FIFA confidence graphic

Country highlights: 25 per cent more Italians, 22 per cent more Costa Ricans, 15 per cent more US, and 8 per cent more British voters have gained confidence in FIFA now as compared to last year.

71 per cent of Chileans, 70 per cent of Germans, and 70 per cent of Dutch voters expressed they do not have confidence in FIFA this year.

57 per cent of Thais, 46 per cent of Italians, and 44 per cent of Japanese voters expressed that they do have confidence in FIFA.

FIFA areas of corruption graphic

Voters were allowed to choose more than one. Below are the percentage of fans that responded to each individual area.

97 per cent of fans are worried about corruption in football. Nearly three quarters of Italians are most worried about match fixing. British fans are most concerned about match fixing, too along with bribery of officials (60 per cent). 67 per cent of US fans are most worried about the bribery of officials.

FIFA Russia 2018 graphic

Country highlights: 71 per cent of Irish, 69 per cent of Dutch, and 68 per cent of both Swedish and British voters are opposed to Russia hosting the 2018 World Cup. In the US, 47 per cent of voters disagree with the decision.

Not surprisingly, 89 per cent of Russians approve of the decision with 57 per cent of Colombians, and 56 per cent of South Africans also approving.

The poll ran from 17 February to 28 February on the Forza Football app.

 

Contact

Deborah Unger
T: +44 74321 66622
E: press@transparency.org

 

Editor's note: We added a short video to this article a few hours after publication on 2 March 2017; all other content remained unchanged.

For any press enquiries please contact press@transparency.org

Latest

Support Transparency International

Support Us

Power for Nigeria’s people

Bribery in electricity supply ruins livelihoods, but Nigeria’s residents are speaking out.

The terrible consequences of police corruption in South Africa

What do we do when those mandated to protect us are serving other interests than public safety and security? In South Africa, police corruption leaves the public exposed to high rates of crime, and causes distrust of the police service while allowing crime to flourish.

Why do DRC citizens report such high levels of corruption?

People's experiences with corruption in the DRC are far worse than in most other African countries. Why is corruption so prevalent in the DRC, why is bribery so commonplace and why do two thirds of citizens feel powerless?

Three ways to stop money laundering through real estate

Around the world, buying property is a favourite method for the corrupt to launder their ill-gotten gains. However, there are concrete measures that make it significantly more difficult for the corrupt to stash their dirty money in real estate.

Announcing the theme for the 19th edition of the International Anti-Corruption Conference (IACC)

Designing 2030: Truth, Trust & Transparency

Protecting Africa’s wildlife from corruption

When they deliberate over amendments to the global wildlife trade regime, CoP18 must address impunity for illegal timber trafficking in Africa as a matter of high priority.

How the US can help Mongolia get to grips with corruption

A series of bi-lateral meetings and a proposed trade agreement present an opportunity for the US to promote rule of law and an independent judiciary in Mongolia.

Blood diamonds and land corruption in Sierra Leone

A community in Sierra Leone has created powerful short videos documenting their experiences of corruption, forced evictions and a botched resettlement programme at the hands of a multinational diamond mining company.

Countries must be more transparent when investigating transnational corruption

Supervisory and justice systems should be transparent and accountable so that the public can assess their performance.

Resilient institutions

Reducing corruption is an important component of the sustainable development agenda, and one that all state parties have an obligation to address. Although corruption is often thought of as a ‘third-world problem’, institutions in the Global North play an important role in the corruption cycle, and are therefore an essential part of the solutions.

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media