Transparency International welcomes good governance goal proposed by new United Nations report

United Nations High Level Panel report on post-2015 priorities

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



Transparency International, the anti-corruption organisation, welcomes the proposal to make transparent and accountable governance a cornerstone in the drive to end world poverty and reduce inequality, as outlined in the report published today by the High Level Panel convened by the United Nations.

The panel -- established to recommend new goals and targets after 2015 when the original Millennium Development Goals are set to expire -- calls for a stand-alone goal to ensure good governance and effective institutions, including a target to reduce bribery and corruption.

The High Level Panel is a group of specially selected individuals representing broad global constituencies. Its report identifies 12 areas for post-2015 United Nations goals, three of which are new additions to the eight original MDG goals identified in 2000 as the Millennium Development Goals. Because of the success of the initiative the United Nations plans to extend and broaden the post 2015 goals. This report is one of several consultative initiatives to draw up a new agenda.

“This is an important first step in ensuring that good governance and anti-corruption will be at the heart of the post-2015 agenda to help end poverty and inequality and ensure a sustainable quality of life for everyone. If we put these two issues at the centre of all activities, it increases the likelihood that the goals will be reached,” said Huguette Labelle, chair of Transparency International.

These new proposals not only focus on a separate goal for governance but also a goal for stable and peaceful societies that includes targets for whether justice systems work with integrity and the police are accountable.  According to Transparency International’s research, people around the world rate the police and judiciary among the three most bribery-prone institutions.

“Strong and corruption-free institutions can deliver prosperity, peace and sustainability, which makes it imperative that good governance provides the anchor for the global political agenda in the years to come,” said Labelle.

In a recent global poll of nearly 600,000 people, conducted by the United Nations to find out what citizens around the world believe are the most important concerns the UN should address, an honest and responsive government came third after good education and better healthcare.

The high level report will be handed over to the UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon, who is responsible for overseeing the next steps of the process to determine the post-2015 goals.  A final list of goals is expected to be ready by 2014. This will be voted on by countries in the General Assembly.

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