Governance at the International Maritime Organisation: The case for reform

Filed under - Climate governance

Report published 2 July 2018
Image of publication cover

The International Maritime Organisation (IMO), the UN’s specialised agency for shipping, aims to create “a regulatory framework for the shipping industry that is fair, effective, universally adopted and implemented.”

Currently, shipping contributes an estimated 2.5 per cent of global emissions, but left unchecked this could grow to 17 per cent by 2050. A failure to dramatically reduce the sector’s GHG emissions will jeopardise the pledges signed by 195 states in the UN Paris Agreement, which aims to limit planetary warming to “well below” 2°C, and ideally to no more than 1.5°C.

This report evaluates the IMO’s governance structure and considers whether it will help or hinder the development of policies, including an effective GHG strategy. Transparency International finds a number of critical governance flaws at the IMO. Four key issues emerge from the assessment: the uneven influence of Member States, the influence of open and private registries, the disproportionate influence of industry, and the lack of delegate accountability.

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Region - Global   
Language(s) - English   
Topic - Accountability   |   Climate governance   |   Environment   |   Intergovernmental bodies   
Tags - Climate change   |   international maritime organisation   |   IMO   |   Shipping   

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