Transparency International Chair asks Mongolia Prime Minister to reject Amnesty Law

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



José Ugaz, chair of Transparency International sent the following letter to Prime Minister Saikhanbileg Chimed of Mongolia today:

Prime Minister Saikhanbileg Chimed
Zasgiin gazriin ordon
Ulaanbaatar 14201
Mongolia
Sent via e-mail: delgermaa@cabinet.gov.mn;
Cc: Parliament speaker Enkhbold Zandaakhuu: secretariat@parliament.mn
 
                                                                                                                           28 October 2015
 
RE: Rejection of proposed Amnesty law and criminal procedure amendments
 
Dear Prime Minister Chimed, Dear Mr. Zandaakhuu,
 
Transparency International is writing to respectfully ask that you reject the proposed Amnesty law and
amendments to the code of criminal procedure, and to express our deep concern that such changes
would severely undermine the positive progress Mongolia has made in tackling corruption.
 
Mongolia has shown great leadership and willingness to address corruption and its damaging effects
to society through the establishment of the Independent Agency Against Corruption (IAAC) in 2007;
joining more than 125 other Anti-Corruption Agencies (ACAs) around the world, 35 in the Asia Pacific
region alone. This growth signifies an identification of ACAs as indispensable partners in the fight
against corruption. Equally worthy of praise are the ratification of the United Nations Convention
against Corruption and the ratification of Mongolia’s anti-corruption law.
 
Given Mongolia’s strong efforts to stop corruption in recent years, Transparency International and its
chapter in Mongolia respectfully ask you to reject the Amnesty Law that includes provisions granting
amnesty to those under investigation for corruption. The law would have the effect that 45 out of the
55 cases the IAAC is currently investigating would be closed and amnesty would be granted to the
accused – potentially sending a worrying message to the Mongolian people that the corrupt will not be
brought to justice. We also ask you to reject the Amendments to the laws regulating the public
prosecutor’s office and code of criminal procedure which would dismantle the IAAC. These changes
to the law contradict Mongolia’s recent strong efforts to combat corruption and would reverse
important efforts to stop corruption.
 
Ahead of the 29th of October discussions on these very important legal issues we ask that you
consider the best path forward for the people of Mongolia and keep the fight against corruption at the
top of your agenda.
 
In collaboration with Transparency International the government can support the efforts to fight
corruption and improve the effectiveness, performance, and independence of the IAAC. The 110
chapters in the Transparency International movement strongly believe that there should be no
impunity for the abuse of power and that the corrupt must be held to account. We passed a resolution
in our 2015 Annual Membership Meeting against amnesty laws in September that named Mongolia.
Therefore, we respectfully call on you to show your support in stopping these unacceptable laws and
provisions before the Mongolian parliament.
 
Respectfully,
José Ugaz
Chair, Transparency International


For any press enquiries please contact

Chris Sanders
Transparency International
T: +49 30 3438 20 666
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Latest

Support Transparency International

Delia Ferreira Rubio elected Chair of Transparency International

At Transparency International’s Annual Membership meeting on 15 October, Delia Ferreira Rubio was elected chair and Rueben Lifuka was elected as vice-chair, along with seven new board members.

How to keep desperately needed humanitarian aid out of the hands of the corrupt

Around the globe, tens of millions of people need humanitarian assistance from governments, humanitarian aid agencies, and the UN, but even when lives are at stake and people at their most vulnerable, corruption and other abuses are not uncommon.

How the IMF can have real impact on fighting corruption

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is meeting in Washington DC this week. We want to send a strong message about what the multi-lateral lender can do to have greater impact on fighting corruption.

The impact of the Azerbaijani Laundromat

Since the story of the Azerbaijani Laundromat broke, Transparency International has been following up on the allegations and, along with OCCRP, calling for action to hold to account the politicians, businesses and intermediaries who were named in this complex money-for-influence scandal.

Corrupción en ascenso en América Latina y el Caribe

Conversamos con más de 22.000 personas en 20 países en América Latina y el Caribe sobre corrupción. Tomando en cuenta el tamaño estimado de la población de estos países, eso significa que alrededor de 90 millones de personas pagaron sobornos.

Corruption on the rise in Latin America and the Caribbean

Transparency International asked more than 22,000 people in Latin America and the Caribbean about corruption in their daily lives. The survey also looks at how institutions are perceived and how corruption has been developing in each country.

Sustainable Development Goals turn two: time to ensure justice for all

September 25, 2017 marks the two-year anniversary of the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals. Transparency International highlights the need for governments to set meaningful targets for success.

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media

Would you like to know more?

Sign up to stay informed about corruption news and our work around the world