Transparency International calls for a full investigation into murder of activist Yameen Rasheed

Friend to Transparency Maldives and advocate of free speech and human rights, Yameen Rasheed will be greatly missed

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



Transparency International, the global anti-corruption movement and its chapter in the Maldives, Transparency Maldives, are shocked at the brutal murder of human rights activist and blogger Yameen Rasheed and call for a full and transparent investigation into his death.

Yameen Rasheed, an outspoken critic of the government in his satirical blog, had received many death threats. He worked tirelessly to find out the truth of the disappearance of his journalist friend Ahmed Rilwan, who worked for the Maldives Independent.

“The international community must put pressure on the government to ensure there is a full investigation into Yameen’s death. Too often the voices of criticism in the Maldives are silenced by harassment and intimidation. This should not be allowed to happen. The government must be seen to protect the space for people to speak up. We send our sincere condolences to the family and friends of Yameen at this difficult time,” said José Ugaz, chair of Transparency International.

Yameen was a fierce critic of the government’s increasingly authoritarian rule and rising religious extremism. He advocated free speech and an end to human rights violations.


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