FIFA fails to tackle corruption crisis

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



Measures announced today by FIFA fall far short of what is required to clean out corruption at FIFA and its associations.

Instead of agreeing to a serious independent reform commission, FIFA today announced yet another task force made up of 10 FIFA confederation members and one independent chair who has not yet been named. This will not be sufficient to win back trust in FIFA.

So far nine current and former officials face corruption charges in the United States. A judge has called FIFA a racketeering-influenced corrupt organisation. Those charged include officials on the highest FIFA committees and responsible for FIFA’s governance and compliance. 

There are on-going investigations into the awarding of the World Cup in 2018 and 2022, and the Swiss authorities are investigating 81 suspicious activities involving FIFA.

Transparency International said that without a real independent reform commission there can be no confidence that FIFA can end its corruption crisis.

“FIFA is a rotten democracy where votes can be bought, bribes can be made and money can be laundered. It has promised reform many times before and failed dismally. They have failed fans and supporters today,” said Neil Martinson, Transparency International’s Director of Communications.

Transparency International with the #NewFIFANow campaign and the International Trade Union Confederation will continue to put pressure on the sponsors to ensure FIFA makes the kind of root and branch reforms that will lead to a new culture of integrity.

Transparency International says that to clean up FIFA has to:

Sepp Blatter was in charge when most of the corruption took place over many years. He should step down immediately. Potential candidates to replace him must accept that without an independent reform commission there will be no confidence or trust in FIFA.


For any press enquiries please contact

Zurich:
Neil Martinson +49 1721994938
Deborah Unger +44 7432166622

Berlin:
T: +49 30 34 38 20 666
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Latest

Support Transparency International

Anti-Corruption Award 2018 - Nominations Open!

Our Anti-Corruption Award recognises the courage and determination of the many individuals and organisations fighting corruption around the world.

Nominate an anti-corruption hero today! 

After Gürtel, what next for Spain’s struggle with political corruption?

At the start of June, the Spanish parliament voted to oust Prime Minister Rajoy after his political party was embroiled in the biggest corruption scandal in Spain’s democratic history. At this critical juncture in Spain’s struggle with political corruption, Transparency International urges all parties to join forces against impunity and support anti-corruption efforts in public life.

Risk of impunity increases with outcome of Portuguese-Angolan corruption trial

A verdict last week by the Lisbon Court of Appeals in the trial of former Angolan vice president Manuel Vicente has disappointed hopes for a triumph of legal due process over politics and impunity. It also has worrying implications for the independence of Portugal’s judiciary.

The UK just made it harder for the corrupt to hide their wealth offshore

If counted together, the United Kingdom and its Overseas Territories and Crown dependencies would rank worst in the world for financial secrecy. Fortunately, this could soon change.

The new IMF anti-corruption framework: 3 things we’ll be looking for a year from now

Last Sunday, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) unveiled its long-awaited framework for “enhanced” engagement with countries on corruption and governance issues. Here are three aspects we at Transparency International will be looking at closely in coming months as the new policy is rolled out.

While the G20 drags its feet, the corrupt continue to benefit from anonymous company ownership

The corrupt don’t like paper trails, they like secrecy. What better way to hide corrupt activity than with a secret company or trust as a front? You can anonymously open bank accounts, make transfers and launder dirty money. If the company is not registered in your name, it can't always be traced back to you.

Urging leaders to act against corruption in the Americas

The hot topic at the 2018 Summit of the Americas is how governments can combat corruption at the highest levels across North and South America.

The impact of land corruption on women: insights from Africa

As part of International Women’s Day, Transparency International is launching the Women, Land and Corruption resource book. This is a collection of unique articles and research findings that describe and analyse the prevalence of land corruption in Africa – and its disproportionate effect on women – presented together with innovative responses from organisations across the continent.

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media