Ukraine: an urgent anti-corruption agenda

Ukraine: an urgent anti-corruption agenda

Despite the continuing political instability in Ukraine, civil society organisations are pressing the interim government to adopt a raft of anti-corruption measures to restore and bolster the rule of law as soon as possible.

The goal is to put in place a legal framework to end the alleged abuses of power that characterised the ousted regime of Victor Yanukovych and his inner circle, not least the use of public funds to finance a lavish lifestyle.

Working together, six organisations, including Transparency International Ukraine, have produced a road-map to reform. They are proposing changes to the constitution and the introduction of new laws to:

An anti-corruption strategy can be enhanced by having an independent coordinating body. That is why these organisations are calling for a national anti-corruption commission that is both independent and well-funded to implement and enforce anti-corruption laws.

Strengthening integrity and accountability

Image of Yanukovych mansion
Yanukovych's mansion near Kiev
has become a symbol of kleptocracy

Transparency International advocates the use of asset declarations for politicians to avoid conflict of interest and to ensure they do not use their positions of power for private gain.

In the past, the political elite in Ukraine were able to hand out government contracts with little scrutiny. This earned the country the reputation as a kleptocracy, where there was impunity for those who were connected to the government.

Investigative journalists are still sifting through the evidence found on the estate of Yanukovych to document how it was possible to siphon off resources from the state for personal use.

Transparency matters

Citizens can only hold their governments to account if they have access to the relevant information. That is why there need to be public registers of interests, including lists of who are the beneficial owners of private companies. This will allow civil society to find out who receives state funds and will highlight conflicts of interest, particularly in procurement.

The state spends millions of dollars of public funds with private contractors. These procurement contracts need to be publicly vetted to limit conflict of interest and ensure adequate competition in the bidding process.

Tough transitions

The continued unrest and uncertainty in Ukraine and the conflict in Crimea and on its eastern borders with Russia will make it hard for any new government to follow through on a legislative reform agenda. Civil society is working to address the deficiencies in the current legal framework.

Transparency International Ukraine has partnered for this with the Center for Political and Legal Reforms, the Center for Political Study and Analysis, the Anticorruption Action Center, the Ukrainian Institute for Public Policy, and the Open Society Foundation.

For any press enquiries please contact press@transparency.org

Latest

Support Transparency International

Risk of impunity increases with outcome of Portuguese-Angolan corruption trial

A verdict last week by the Lisbon Court of Appeals in the trial of former Angolan vice president Manuel Vicente has disappointed hopes for a triumph of legal due process over politics and impunity. It also has worrying implications for the independence of Portugal’s judiciary.

The UK just made it harder for the corrupt to hide their wealth offshore

If counted together, the United Kingdom and its Overseas Territories and Crown dependencies would rank worst in the world for financial secrecy. Fortunately, this could soon change.

The new IMF anti-corruption framework: 3 things we’ll be looking for a year from now

Last Sunday, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) unveiled its long-awaited framework for “enhanced” engagement with countries on corruption and governance issues. Here are three aspects we at Transparency International will be looking at closely in coming months as the new policy is rolled out.

While the G20 drags its feet, the corrupt continue to benefit from anonymous company ownership

The corrupt don’t like paper trails, they like secrecy. What better way to hide corrupt activity than with a secret company or trust as a front? You can anonymously open bank accounts, make transfers and launder dirty money. If the company is not registered in your name, it can't always be traced back to you.

Urging leaders to act against corruption in the Americas

The hot topic at the 2018 Summit of the Americas is how governments can combat corruption at the highest levels across North and South America.

The impact of land corruption on women: insights from Africa

As part of International Women’s Day, Transparency International is launching the Women, Land and Corruption resource book. This is a collection of unique articles and research findings that describe and analyse the prevalence of land corruption in Africa – and its disproportionate effect on women – presented together with innovative responses from organisations across the continent.

Passport dealers of Europe: navigating the Golden Visa market

Coast or mountains? Real estate or business investment? Want your money back in five years? If you're rich, there are an array of options for European ‘Golden Visas’ at your fingertips, each granting EU residence or citizenship rights.

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media