Everything you need to know about the 18th International Anti-Corruption Conference (#18IACC)

Everything you need to know about the 18th International Anti-Corruption Conference (#18IACC)

The 18th International Anti-Corruption Conference (IACC) will take place from 22-24 October in Copenhagen, Denmark under the theme Together for Development, Peace and Security: Now is the Time to Act. The ambition is to move the fight against corruption from words to action.

The conference takes place in the Bella Center in Copenhagen and is organised by the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs together with the IACC Council and Transparency International, who is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. The world’s largest independent forum for fighting corruption will bring together more than 1200 participants from all over the world and is hosted by Ulla Tørnæs, Minister for Development Cooperation of Denmark. 

Leading experts, innovators and activists from civil society, government, business and academia will debate - in more than 50 workshops and 6 high-level plenaries - how to turn anti-corruption pledges into concrete actions. They will discuss how we can work together towards sustainable development, peace and security in today’s increasingly polarised world where democracy is being weakened in too many countries.

See the latest news from the IACC here or subscribe to the IACC newsletter

Follow and join the conversation on Twitter & Facebook using the official hashtag #18IACC

#18IACC Highlights

  • Opening Ceremony and Plenary: The conference will open with speeches by Danish Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen, Danish Minister for Development Cooperation, Ulla Tørnæs, and other international leaders. 
  • Anti-Corruption Award: On the first day, winners of the 2018 Anti-Corruption Award, which honours remarkable individuals and organisations worldwide who expose and fight corruption, will be announced. See the shortlisted candidates.
  • High-level segment: This year, the #18IACC includes a high-level segment, where around 40 ministers, leaders of international organisations and private companies will come together to discuss strategies for the international collaboration on anti-corruption. Participants are expected to present concrete action plans. 
  • Events: More than 70 events will take place as part of the #18IACC. These include anti-corruption related workshops, movie screenings and more. See the full agenda here.
  • Film festival: Films 4 Transparency will take place from 20 to 25 October. The festival will include movies that explore corruption, inequality and injustice around the world. 
Get your tickets for Fair Play Live 2018 with yasiin bey (formerly Mos Def)! Buy now!
  • Concert: On Tuesday 23 October, the Fair Play 2018 concert will take place at VEGA in Copenhagen with yasiin bey (formerly Mos Def). Fair Play is a global movement of music against corruption, created by young, engaged and creative artists from around the world. 

Young Journalists Initiative

The #18IACC will be covered by young journalists from around the world who are passionate about anti-corruption and have a desire to speak out on social issues related to transparency and integrity. In 2010, the Young Journalist (YJ) Initiative was launched at the 14th IACC in Bangkok, Thailand. The project was successful and the IACC continues to engage more young journalists for the conference and the YJ networkLearn more on how to apply to become a YJ for the next IACC! 

The IACC is an open for everyone interested, however registration is required. You can find information about how to register and press accreditation here: https://iaccseries.org/plan-your-trip/registration/

About the Anti-Corruption Award

Launched in 2000 as the Integrity Award, and renamed in 2016, the Anti-Corruption Award honours remarkable individuals and organisations worldwide, including journalists, public prosecutors, government officials and civil society leaders.

Winners are a source of inspiration to the anti-corruption movement because their actions echo a common message: that corruption can be challenged.

Shortlisted candidates for the 2018 Anti-Corruption Award

  • Daphne Caruana Galizia (posthumous) was a brave and effective investigative journalist who exposed major corruption scandals involving powerful politicians and other individuals in Malta and abroad. She was murdered in October 2017.  
  • The International Commission against Impunity in Guatemala (CICIG) is an international body responsible for investigating and prosecuting serious crime in Guatemala. Iván Velásquez, the CICIG Commissioner, has recently been banned from entering the country as part of government efforts to inhibit anti-corruption efforts.
  • Khadija Ismayilova is a celebrated investigative journalist and human rights activist in Azerbaijan, currently facing a travel ban. She has contributed multiple investigative reports to Radio Free Europe and the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (OCCRP).
  • Ana Garrido Ramos is a former public servant at Boadilla del Monte Town Hall in Madrid, Spain, whose whistleblower revelations triggered the Gürtel case that led to the fall of the Spanish government. She is campaigning for effective whistleblower protection legislation. 

For any press enquiries please contact press@transparency.org

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