2014 and 2015 Corruption Perceptions Index tables corrected

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



The Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) results tables for 2014 and 2015 have been corrected for a number of countries because of an error discovered during a review of past CPI results. The mistake was due to a human error in transferring data from specific sources to the CPI computation files at Transparency International’s Secretariat.

In 2014, the error affected three countries. In 2015 a similar mistake affected 11 countries. These incorrect scores also changed the ranks of 21 additional countries/territories in 2014 and 31 countries/territories in 2015 by one position.

All scores and ranks have been corrected. All website content referring to the countries in question has also been amended. All other results remain unchanged.

2014 Corruption Perceptions Index

Because of the error the 2014 CPI did not include Saint Lucia as it did not appear to have the requisite three data sources. It is now included. But the 2014 CPI did include Samoa, which should not have been included because it only had two data sources. The error also led to a revision in the score for Saint Vincent and Grenadines from 67 to 62. These mistakes have now been corrected.

2015 Corruption Perceptions Index

The following countries have had their 2015 CPI scores corrected:

 

Country Published CPI 2015 Revised CPI 2015
New Zealand 88 91
Norway 87 88
Luxembourg 81 85
Netherlands 87 84
Portugal 63 64
Poland 62 63
Malta 56 60
Lithuania 61 59
Latvia 55 56
Korea (South) 56 54
Mexico 35 31

 

In order to prevent any future mistakes of this kind, the verification procedures used for the CPI have been strengthened as of 2016, including among other things external, completely independent calculations of the results. Going forward the level of quality control will be increased to further reduce the risk of human error. The source description document has also been updated to clarify the underlying questions asked by the CPI sources and how this data is used in the CPI calculations.

The methodology used for calculating the CPI since 2012 remains strong and valid, and will continue to be used in future editions of the CPI.

For a more in-depth explanation on the background to the errors, please read this blog post.

 

Note to editors: The Corruption Perceptions Index is the most widely used indicator of corruption worldwide. For more information on the CPI, please see here.


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