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Tailor-made laws in the Western Balkans and Turkey

Rulebook determining the appearance of kiosks in Belgrade - Tailor-made laws in the Western Balkans and Turkey

Rulebook determining the appearance of kiosks in Belgrade

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Introduction

In 2015, the city of Belgrade published a new rulebook prescribing identical types of kiosks in three central city municipalities.

The rulebook determines the type, size and other characteristics of the kiosks in public and other areas in the municipalities of Vračar, Savski Venac and Stari Grad. Articles 2, 3, 4 and 5 of the rulebook describe the exact types and sizes of these kiosks as well as the size of the surfaces they are erected on.

Country
Serbia
Sector
Trade and customs
Type of Law
Capturing a market, an industry or public resources

Description of the law

In 2015, the city of Belgrade published a new rulebook prescribing identical types of kiosks in three central city municipalities.

The rulebook determines the type, size and other characteristics of the kiosks in public and other areas in the municipalities of Vračar, Savski Venac and Stari Grad. Articles 2, 3, 4 and 5 of the rulebook describe the exact types and sizes of these kiosks as well as the size of the surfaces they are erected on.

Two years before Siniša Mali, the mayor of Belgrade, signed the decision regulating the appearance of kiosks in the city centre, the Štampa sistem company erected an identical kiosk in the pedestrian zone of the city centre. According to media reports, there had been no public consultation and no design competition before the decision on the new appearance of kiosks in Belgrade was made in December 2015. Based on this decision, the specified kiosk type, which had first appeared in 2013, became the only permitted kiosk type two years later.

With a single kiosk costing €10,000–12,000, the total cost of replacing about 750 kiosks would be approximately €9 million.

Štampa sistem company, which erected a kiosk in 2013 identical to the type later approved by the city, was owned by Centro štampa holding, a subsidiary of the Centroproizvod company. Centroproizvod changed its name to My Kiosk Group in 2015. This group is owned by the offshore Property Plus establishment and businessman Darko Bajčetić (see here). Centro štampa holding opened a plant for the production of kiosks in 2014 .