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The violence against the people of Libya must stop now, says Transparency International

Transparency International (TI) condemns the attacks on the people of Libya and calls on the government to stop the violent reprisals now and release all those unlawfully arrested.

TI further condemns the intimidation faced by citizens and civil society in Yemen and Bahrain and calls on the authorities to release people arrested for exercising their right to free speech.

Political leaders in the region should listen to the unequivocal voices of the people demanding more freedom, respect for human rights and an end to endemic corruption.

Media reports estimate at least 200 people have been killed so far in Libya and that the death toll is rising in violent clashes between government forces and the people across the country.

The actions of civil society have for a long time been restricted in Libya. TI calls on the government of Libya to protect its citizens and provide a safe space for them to express their views.

Libya and its leader Muammar Gaddafi should adhere to the provisions of the United Nations International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, which the country has signed and ratified. The Covenant commits its parties to respect the civil and political rights of individuals, including freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, electoral rights and rights to due process and a fair trial.

Libya has also ratified the UN Convention against Corruption in 2005, which in addition to providing a legal framework for fighting corruption, also guarantees access to information for all citizens, something lacking in Libya.

TI brings people together in a powerful worldwide coalition to end the devastating impact of corruption on men, women and children around the world. TI’s mission is to create change towards a world free of corruption.


For any press enquiries please contact

Deborah Wise Unger, Media and Public Relations Manager
Transparency International
T:+49 30 34 38 20 666
E:press@transparency.org

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