Slovakia 2012

Filed under - Surveys

Published by Transparency international Slovakia on 23 February 2012

Image of publication cover

The sixteen assessed pillars in the Slovak National Integrity System could be divided into two groups based on their performance - better performing (stronger) and not well performing (weaker) pillars. Such division is obviously simplifying, however allows us to cluster the pillars into two sets of institutions possessing, in some extent, common features.

The first set contains pillars with established entities and mechanisms of functioning that, in general, have been lately less turbulent in functioning and delivering respective tasks in proper way.

This involves for example Supreme Audit Office, Legislature, Media, Civil Society etc. Contrary, the second group contains entities that have been either operating in unstable environment (e.g. Judiciary, Prosecution, Police, Public Procurement Office) or have been less involved in anti-corruption or integrity policies.

Generally, Slovakia has well developed legal framework in terms of NIS. However it lacks implementation skills and mainstreaming of specific integrity mechanisms across the sectors.

Download the report | View online





Country / Territory - Slovakia   
Language(s) - English   
Topic - Access to information   |   Accountability   |   Civil society   |   Defence and security   |   Environment   |   Governance   |   Intergovernmental bodies   |   Judiciary   |   Media   |   Politics and government   |   Public services   |   Surveys   
Tags - Institutions   |   ombudsman   |   Supreme Audit Office   

NIS assessments contact

Andrew McDevitt
Programme Coordinator, Public Sector Integrity
+49 30 3438 20 720
amcdevitt@transparency.org

More NIS assessments

European NIS Project

True stories

Restoring hope

Fadzai’s aunt managed to save enough money to buy the child a school uniform. Little did she know at the time, that was the start of her troubles. Read the story

Balancing the budget

Government cars were frequently misused for private journeys, or by friends and relatives. Some were reportedly even being sent abroad. Read the story