Transparency International Chair asks Mongolia Prime Minister to reject Amnesty Law

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



José Ugaz, chair of Transparency International sent the following letter to Prime Minister Saikhanbileg Chimed of Mongolia today:

Prime Minister Saikhanbileg Chimed
Zasgiin gazriin ordon
Ulaanbaatar 14201
Mongolia
Sent via e-mail: delgermaa@cabinet.gov.mn;
Cc: Parliament speaker Enkhbold Zandaakhuu: secretariat@parliament.mn
 
                                                                                                                           28 October 2015
 
RE: Rejection of proposed Amnesty law and criminal procedure amendments
 
Dear Prime Minister Chimed, Dear Mr. Zandaakhuu,
 
Transparency International is writing to respectfully ask that you reject the proposed Amnesty law and
amendments to the code of criminal procedure, and to express our deep concern that such changes
would severely undermine the positive progress Mongolia has made in tackling corruption.
 
Mongolia has shown great leadership and willingness to address corruption and its damaging effects
to society through the establishment of the Independent Agency Against Corruption (IAAC) in 2007;
joining more than 125 other Anti-Corruption Agencies (ACAs) around the world, 35 in the Asia Pacific
region alone. This growth signifies an identification of ACAs as indispensable partners in the fight
against corruption. Equally worthy of praise are the ratification of the United Nations Convention
against Corruption and the ratification of Mongolia’s anti-corruption law.
 
Given Mongolia’s strong efforts to stop corruption in recent years, Transparency International and its
chapter in Mongolia respectfully ask you to reject the Amnesty Law that includes provisions granting
amnesty to those under investigation for corruption. The law would have the effect that 45 out of the
55 cases the IAAC is currently investigating would be closed and amnesty would be granted to the
accused – potentially sending a worrying message to the Mongolian people that the corrupt will not be
brought to justice. We also ask you to reject the Amendments to the laws regulating the public
prosecutor’s office and code of criminal procedure which would dismantle the IAAC. These changes
to the law contradict Mongolia’s recent strong efforts to combat corruption and would reverse
important efforts to stop corruption.
 
Ahead of the 29th of October discussions on these very important legal issues we ask that you
consider the best path forward for the people of Mongolia and keep the fight against corruption at the
top of your agenda.
 
In collaboration with Transparency International the government can support the efforts to fight
corruption and improve the effectiveness, performance, and independence of the IAAC. The 110
chapters in the Transparency International movement strongly believe that there should be no
impunity for the abuse of power and that the corrupt must be held to account. We passed a resolution
in our 2015 Annual Membership Meeting against amnesty laws in September that named Mongolia.
Therefore, we respectfully call on you to show your support in stopping these unacceptable laws and
provisions before the Mongolian parliament.
 
Respectfully,
José Ugaz
Chair, Transparency International


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Chris Sanders
Transparency International
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