A blueprint to make banks behave

Filed under - Financial markets

Opinion by Jermyn Brooks in Reuters Opinion – 5 March 2013
Image of speaker/author

Banking integrity has become an oxymoron. Top bankers need to change this and take responsibility for tackling ethical issues. For this to happen, every part of the organization – from senior management to human resources managers to those on the trading floor and beyond – should be assessed according to the contribution it makes to promoting ethical values, not just the bottom line.

The investigations into the LIBOR rate-rigging scandal showed how commonplace bribery among dealers had become. For example, between September 2008 and August 2009 a single trader at the Royal Bank of Scotland had made corrupt payments to interbank brokers on 30 occasions, by means of risk-free transactions known as “wash trades.”

While the likes of Barclays and RBS have acknowledged wrongdoings and vowed to change course, it’s no longer enough to mollify critics with soothing words, apologies and empty gestures.

Read more on the Reuters website

Country / Territory - International   
Region - Global   
Language(s) - English   
Topic - Accountability   |   Financial markets   |   Private sector   
Tags - Jermyn Brooks   |   Banks   |   LIBOR rate scandal   |   Bonuses   |   Accountability   

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