Transparency International Global Corruption Report: Sport highlights scale of corruption in Africa

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat

The launch today of Transparency International’s Global Corruption Report: Sport highlights that Africa is vulnerable to serious reputational risks across all sports and is already compromised by corruption.  

The Global Corruption Report: Sport provides a global overview of corruption across sport and outlines recommendations from leading experts in the field on what needs to be done. It comes at a time when some of the world’s most popular sports, including football and athletics, are mired in corruption scandals.

In Africa the report highlights serious gaps in accountability, including:

The lack of transparency in African football was also recently highlighted by Transparency International’s Football Governance League table, which showed that only one African football association, Egypt, made its financial records accessible online, while the African Football Confederation (CAF) still has no code of ethics or ethics commission.  

“The global picture of corruption in sport and the lack of trust that those who participate and enjoy sports should be a wake-up call for all those in positions of power. Sport has the power to do so much good: to bring communities together, to instil values of integrity and fair play. That’s why it is so important to rid sport of corruption,” said Elena Panfilova, vice-chair of Transparency International, who launched the report with Transparency International Kenya in Nairobi.

Samuel Kimeu, Executive Director of Transparency International Kenya said that "Building integrity in sport is not an option. Sports organisations should demonstrate accountability to all their stakeholders including their membership, athletes and fans. Fundamental governance principles such as transparency, access to information and public participation should be integrated and promoted in sports management. Governments should ensure adequate legislation and regulations to enhance integrity in sport, and ensure that these are well enforced. Fans should demand transparency and accountability off the pitch, in the same spirit that they demand victory on the pitch."

“Corrupt sports officials are not just stealing money, they are also stealing the future of our youth, the future of our athletes and the future of our sports. This is why no one should stand on the sidelines or remain seated in the stands during the continuing struggle for corruption-free sport,” said MYSA founder/executive chairman and founding director of the Kenyan Premier League, Bob Munro, a contributor to the report.

The Global Corruption Report: Sport provides clear recommendations that apply directly to African regional and national sport organisations including:

The Global Corruption Report also calls on all participants in sport to speak out.  

“The responsibility now lies with the participants of sport, from the grassroots to elite professionals, fans, sponsors, governments and, most of all, sport organisations themselves, to demand the changes that are clearly needed, for the good of sport and the good of humanity,” said Brazil’s 1994 World Cup winning captain and report contributor Rai de Souza in the foreword to the report.

“The issues affecting sport in Africa today mirror all of those issues on the world stage, but public attention is not yet focused on the need for radical change here. Large-scale reforms must not only be implemented but be seen to be implemented transparently if Africa’s public can restore their trust in the running of African sport,” said Panfilova.

Note to editors: The Global Corruption Report: Sport addresses corruption risks in the key areas of sports governance, match-fixing and big events, and provides targeted recommendations. There are over 60 articles, including 18 country articles. It includes contributions from the International Olympic Committee, UNESCO, government bodies, players and supporters’ organisations, athletes past and present, civil society, academics and journalists. It is available online for free here and contact us for hard copies.

For any press enquiries please contact

Deborah Unger (in London)
T: +44 208 960 2526
M: +44 743216 6622
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)


Support Transparency International

#18IACC: Call for workshop proposals now open!

The 18th edition of the International Anti-Corruption Conference to take place in Copenhagen from 22-24 October 2018 is thrilled to announce that the call for workshop proposals is now open. Help us shape the #18IACC agenda! Anyone interested in the fight against corruption is welcome to submit a proposal.

The impact of land corruption on women: insights from Africa

As part of International Women’s Day, Transparency International is launching the Women, Land and Corruption resource book. This is a collection of unique articles and research findings that describe and analyse the prevalence of land corruption in Africa – and its disproportionate effect on women – presented together with innovative responses from organisations across the continent.

Passport dealers of Europe: navigating the Golden Visa market

Coast or mountains? Real estate or business investment? Want your money back in five years? If you're rich, there are an array of options for European ‘Golden Visas’ at your fingertips, each granting EU residence or citizenship rights.

How the G20 can make state-owned enterprises champions of integrity

For the first time in its presidency of the G20, Argentina is hosting country representatives from across the globe to address the best ways of curtailing corruption and promoting integrity in state-owned enterprises (SOEs).

Europe and Central Asia: More civil engagement needed (Part II)

As follow-up to the regional analysis of Eastern Europe and Central Asia, additional examples from Albania, Kosovo and Georgia highlight the need for more progress in anti-corruption efforts in these countries and across the region.

Lutte contre la corruption en Afrique: Du bon et du moins bon

La publication de la dernière édition de l’Indice de perception de la corruption (IPC) offre un bon point de repère pour situer les efforts de lutte contre la corruption que l’Union africaine (UA) poursuivra tout au long de 2018

No hay cambios en las percepciones pese a los avances en América

En los últimos años, América Latina y el Caribe lograron adelantos significativos en la lucha contra la corrupción. En muchos países de la región existen ahora leyes y mecanismos para contrarrestar este fenómeno, las investigaciones legales están avanzando y los movimientos ciudadanos anticorrupción han incrementado. Sin embargo, de acuerdo con el Índice de Percepción de la Corrupción (IPC) 2017, la región continúa con bajos puntajes.

A redefining moment for Africa

The newly released Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) provides a good baseline for the African Union (AU) anti-corruption efforts in 2018. This year’s theme for the AU is “Winning the Fight against Corruption: A Sustainable Path to Africa’s Transformation.” As the AU rolls out its plan, this is an important moment for Africa to take stock of the current situation.

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media

Would you like to know more?

Sign up to stay informed about corruption news and our work around the world