Transparency International welcomes the completion of first round of e-declarations in Ukraine

Now it is time to verify the declarations made by top officials and the origin of their declared assets

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



Transparency International, the global anti-corruption movement and its partner in Ukraine, welcome the completion of the first step in providing the Ukrainian people with a public electronic register of the assets of politicians and senior civil servants, including those of President Petro Poroshenko.

Transparency International now calls for the declarations and the origin of the declared assets to be verified, and welcomes President Poroshenko’s commitment in this regard.

“President Poroshenko has kept his promise to introduce an asset register and to declare his own wealth. This is a major achievement and a good step for delivering on needed anti-corruption reforms. Ukraine now needs to empower the anti-corruption authorities and provide them with resources to investigate and hold to account those who have enriched themselves illegally,” said José Ugaz, chair of Transparency International.

The first tranche of assets made public surprised Ukrainians who saw how many public officials owned large amounts of wealth, including artworks, jewellery and fancy cars, as well as luxury property. Now the challenge for the anti-corruption institutions in Ukraine is to effectively distinguish between legally acquired and corrupt wealth in order for Ukrainians to continue believing in the fight against corruption.

Transparency International calls on the National Agency on Corruption Prevention (NACP) to work closely with Ukrainian citizens and journalists to check the declarations of public officials and the origins of their declared assets if their lifestyles do not conform to their reported incomes.

“We are also waiting for the State to verify the information in the filed declarations and reports. Public officials who made false declarations or are found to have illicit wealth must be brought to justice,” said Yaroslav Yurchyshyn, the Executive Director of TI Ukraine, Transparency International’s partner in the country.

E-declarations, however, are only one instrument for exposing potential corruption. The National Anti-Corruption Bureau of Ukraine (NABU) must follow through with investigations into the origin of declared income using all the tools at its disposal, including court approved autonomous wiretapping. The NACP must also be able to demonstrate intent by officials for cases to be successful. 

Finally an independent Anti-Corruption Court must be established as soon as possible, with active participation and support of international experts. The court would have the specific mandate to end impunity of corrupt officials and to pursue cases of corrupt officials in a timely fashion. This would support the judicial reform launched on 30 September 2016 to make the judicial and law enforcement systems of Ukraine independent and reliable in practice.


For any press enquiries please contact

Natalie Baharav
T: +49 30 3438 20 666
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Transparency International Ukraine
Olga Tymchenko
T: +38 050 352 96 18
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Latest

Support Transparency International

Risk of impunity increases with outcome of Portuguese-Angolan corruption trial

A verdict last week by the Lisbon Court of Appeals in the trial of former Angolan vice president Manuel Vicente has disappointed hopes for a triumph of legal due process over politics and impunity. It also has worrying implications for the independence of Portugal’s judiciary.

The UK just made it harder for the corrupt to hide their wealth offshore

If counted together, the United Kingdom and its Overseas Territories and Crown dependencies would rank worst in the world for financial secrecy. Fortunately, this could soon change.

The new IMF anti-corruption framework: 3 things we’ll be looking for a year from now

Last Sunday, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) unveiled its long-awaited framework for “enhanced” engagement with countries on corruption and governance issues. Here are three aspects we at Transparency International will be looking at closely in coming months as the new policy is rolled out.

While the G20 drags its feet, the corrupt continue to benefit from anonymous company ownership

The corrupt don’t like paper trails, they like secrecy. What better way to hide corrupt activity than with a secret company or trust as a front? You can anonymously open bank accounts, make transfers and launder dirty money. If the company is not registered in your name, it can't always be traced back to you.

Urging leaders to act against corruption in the Americas

The hot topic at the 2018 Summit of the Americas is how governments can combat corruption at the highest levels across North and South America.

The impact of land corruption on women: insights from Africa

As part of International Women’s Day, Transparency International is launching the Women, Land and Corruption resource book. This is a collection of unique articles and research findings that describe and analyse the prevalence of land corruption in Africa – and its disproportionate effect on women – presented together with innovative responses from organisations across the continent.

Passport dealers of Europe: navigating the Golden Visa market

Coast or mountains? Real estate or business investment? Want your money back in five years? If you're rich, there are an array of options for European ‘Golden Visas’ at your fingertips, each granting EU residence or citizenship rights.

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media