Transparency International demands repeal of legal changes granting immunity to Romanian politicians

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



Transparency International demands the immediate repeal of new legal amendments passed earlier this week in Romania that exempts the president, as well as members of the Chamber of Deputies and the Senate from corruption charges while in office. These developments risk opening the door for corrupt politicians to act with impunity.

The Chamber of Deputies recently adopted two amendments to the Criminal Code through which all appointed or elected officials are no longer criminally liable for corruption charges against them. Debate on the law was hidden from the public, nor was civil society consulted before voting on the changes in law.

Transparency International also demands that all changes to legislation like those on the immunity of lawmakers from corruption charges be transparently debated with civil society in advance of voting. If done this way, Romania would have avoided the huge national and international outcry over this new law.

We take this opportunity to underline that the Criminal Code has to be reviewed and improved before coming into force in February 2014.

Transparency International will closely monitor this situation going forward.


For any press enquiries please contact

Chris Sanders
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