Transparency International calls on Ukraine President to fulfil his anti-corruption commitments

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



Ukraine must not delay the launch of a key electronic system to monitor the assets and interests of politicians and public servants, according to Transparency International, the global anti-corruption organisation.

In June, when José Ugaz, Chair of Transparency International, met with the President of Ukraine Petro Poroshenko, the president committed to launching the e-declaration system in August.

The new progressive corruption prevention law enacted in 2015 will make it mandatory for all public servants, politicians, managers of state and communal enterprises, and other employees who are paid by the state, to declare their full income and assets by submitting an online form. Politicians and high-ranked civil servants should make the first e-declarations in mid-2016 via this new platform.

 “It is time for Ukraine to take serious steps to combat the endemic corruption in both its political and business sectors. President Poroshenko promised that this simple electronic platform would be launched in August and that anyone who lied on the forms would be criminally liable. He must hold to his word and ensure that this happens despite the fact that it faces strong political opposition from those interested in avoiding transparency,” said Transparency International’s Ugaz.

 “If the system does not go into operation, the world will see that President Poroshenko is not serious about tackling corruption and holding those who are corrupt to account,” said Ugaz.

Failure to launch the certified system on time will also affect Ukraine’s prospects in obtaining visa free travel with the European Union.

In the past six months various obstacles have been introduced to stop the activation of the e-declaration system, which was developed and tested with help from the UN Development Programme and the World Bank.

The State Agency for Information Protection and Special Communications of Ukraine (SAIP) – a central executive body status which is coordinated by the Cabinet of Ministers, but also depends on the President of Ukraine and the National Security and Defence Council, must certify the system before it can go live and before information in it can be used in criminal prosecutions.

In recent weeks the SAIP cited technical issues that could delay the agreement it reached with the National Agency for Corruption Prevention (NACP) for a 15 August launch.

“Technology is not the problem. The failure to keep to the schedule would be political.  It’s in the hands of the political leadership to ensure the launch goes ahead,” said Yaroslav Yurchyshyn, Executive Director of Transparency International Ukraine.

The NACP will have the role of monitoring and verifying the declarations. Any omissions or false statements can result in criminal prosecution, something Ukrainian lawmakers had tried to stop.


For any press enquiries please contact

Natalie Baharav
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
+49 30 34 38 20 666

Latest

Support Transparency International

The terrible consequences of police corruption in South Africa

What do we do when those mandated to protect us are serving other interests than public safety and security? In South Africa, police corruption leaves the public exposed to high rates of crime, and causes distrust of the police service while allowing crime to flourish.

Why do DRC citizens report such high levels of corruption?

People's experiences with corruption in the DRC are far worse than in most other African countries. Why is corruption so prevalent in the DRC, why is bribery so commonplace and why do two thirds of citizens feel powerless?

Is Mauritius at a tipping point in the fight against corruption?

According to the latest GCB for Africa, very few Mauritians who accessed public services, like health care and education, had to pay a bribe for those services. But given recent scandals, citizens still see certain groups and institutions as corrupt.

Countries must be more transparent when investigating transnational corruption

Supervisory and justice systems should be transparent and accountable so that the public can assess their performance.

Resilient institutions

Reducing corruption is an important component of the sustainable development agenda, and one that all state parties have an obligation to address. Although corruption is often thought of as a ‘third-world problem’, institutions in the Global North play an important role in the corruption cycle, and are therefore an essential part of the solutions.

In whose interest? Political integrity and corruption in Africa

What accounts for the wide disparity in peoples’ perceptions of the integrity of elected representatives in different countries? In this piece, we will to look at various forms of political corruption, how they manifest in African countries and what can be done to promote political integrity.

Cidadãos opinam sobre a corrupção em África

A décima edição do Barómetro Global de Corrupção (GCB) – África revela que embora a maioria das pessoas na África acreditem que os níveis de corrupção aumentaram no seu país, elas também se sentem otimistas, pois acreditam que os cidadãos podem fazer a diferença no combate à corrupção.

Les citoyens africains expriment leur opinion sur la corruption

La 10e édition du Baromètre mondial de la corruption – Afrique révèle que la plupart des Africains pensent que la corruption a augmenté dans leur pays, mais aussi que la majorité d’entre eux s’estiment capables, en tant que citoyens, de changer la donne dans la lutte contre la corruption.

Global Corruption Barometer - Africa 2019

The Global Corruption Barometer (GCB) – Africa reveals that more than half of all citizens surveyed in 35 African countries think corruption is getting worse in their country. 59 per cent of people think their government is doing badly at tackling corruption.

Citizens speak out about corruption in Africa

The Global Corruption Barometer (GCB) – Africa, reveals that while most people in Africa feel corruption increased in their country, a majority also feel optimistic that they can make a difference in the fight against corruption.

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media