The conviction of former Brazilian President Lula for corruption shows the strength of the judiciary

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



Following the 12 July conviction and sentencing of former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva on corruption charges as part of the Lava Jato (Car Wash) investigation, Transparency International Chair José Ugaz said:

“The conviction of former President Lula is a significant sign that the rule of law is working in Brazil and that there is no impunity, even for the powerful.

“Lula is not the only high-level politician who is the focus of corruption investigations. The current president, Michel Temer, who is from the opposite end of the political spectrum, is also facing corruption charges, as is Senator Aécio Neves, who ran against former president Dilma Rousseff in the last presidential elections. 

“The Brazilian Congress and the Supreme Court will also have to decide on these two cases. They must act with impartiality and there must be no impunity. 

“The Lava Jato scandal has touched politicians of all parties and Brazil’s most powerful businesspeople. It is not surprising the Lava Jato investigators and judges are now facing attacks from all sides. This is proof that corruption does not distinguish between ideologies or political parties. Transparency International calls for guarantees that the investigations can proceed and that all judicial processes remain independent and free from interference from any political party.”

The Lava Jato investigation is focussed on the deals made by politicians and businesspeople in exchange for contracts. Transparency International honoured the Lava Jato team with its 2016 Anti-Corruption Award for its courageous and dedicated work in the fight against corruption.


For any press enquiries please contact

Flavia Tavares
T: +55 11 3817 7914
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Natalie Baharav
T: +49 30 34 38 20 666
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Latest

Support Transparency International

Antoine Deltour: LuxLeaks whistleblower’s long legal battle continues

On Thursday 23 November, the High Court of Luxembourg will announce its verdict in the case of Antoine Deltour, the whistleblower who revealed aggressive tax avoidance schemes in Luxembourg by sharing the 'LuxLeaks' documents with journalists in 2014.

Open letter to the President of Equatorial Guinea: Ramon Esono Ebalé must be released

It has been two months since the artist and satirist Ramon Esono Ebalé was detained without charge in Equatorial Guinea. Transparency International joined with 17 organisations and individuals to write to President Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo. We are calling for his immediate release.

Global Corruption Barometer: citizens’ voices from around the world

Transparency International believes that people’s experience and perceptions of corruption are key for understanding corruption risks around the world. Our Global Corruption Barometer is the world's largest survey asking citizens about their direct personal experience of corruption in their daily lives - check it out here!

How the Honduran military and police profit from the illegal arms trade

An investigation by InSight Crime and Transparency International Honduras has found that many of the guns used in homicides in Honduras come from Honduran military and police stockpiles.

#ParadisePapers: time to clean up the offshore financial havens

The ‘Paradise Papers’ show how the rich and powerful around the world are able to avoid paying tax and keep their business dealings secret. The mechanisms they use can also benefit the corrupt, and must be made more transparent.

Uzbekistan: How to support the real victims of grand corruption

What do you do when assets stolen from a country’s state coffers by corrupt individuals have been recovered and can now be returned to the country - but the government is still controlled by corrupt people? That’s the case of Uzbekistan, one of the most corrupt countries in the world.

Entrevista con testigo clave en el Caso Obiang: Delfin Mocache Massoko

En el 27 de octubre 2017, la justicia francesa ha condenado a Teodoro Nguema Obiang Mangue, vicepresidente de Guinea Ecuatorial, a tres años de cárcel extentos de cumplimiento, una multa de 30 millones de euros (US$35 millones) y confiscó todos sus activos en Francia. Antes de que se anunciara el veredicto, entrevistamos a Delfin Mocache Massoko, un testigo clave en el caso, para descubrir qué significa el juicio para él y los ciudadanos de Guinea Ecuatorial.

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media

Would you like to know more?

Sign up to stay informed about corruption news and our work around the world