President should veto new law granting amnesty for corruption says TI and TI Mongolia

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



The President of Mongolia should veto a new law granting amnesty for those under investigation for corruption, said Transparency International, the global anti-corruption movement and Transparency International Mongolia, its chapter in Mongolia.

The law was passed in a closed door session of the parliament on 11 August without the presence of the opposition parties. Unless president blocks law within 5 working days and 26 MPs accept this, law will come into force.

Currently 45 out of the 55 cases that the Independent Agency against Corruption in Mongolia (IAAC) is investigating would be terminated and amnesty granted to the accused. The alleged crimes involve more than 32 billion Mongolian Tugrik (US$16.2 million).

Those who were under investigation by the IAAC and the former President N. Enkhbayar had pushed for this new amnesty law, which also clears any criminal records allowing people to continue their political careers. 

Parliament speaker Z. Enkhbold supported this controversial law.  The former Prime minister is also proposing a law to dismantle the IAAC.

Transparency International-Secretariat and Transparency International Mongolia strongly condemn such actions. “There should be no impunity for the abuse of power; the corrupt must be held to account,” said Srirak Plipat, Regional Director for Asia Pacific for Transparency International.

“Politicians should not abuse their power to escape justice. Corruption must not pay and it is time we no longer tolerate impunity for the corrupt. We will politically and socially sanction the corrupt,” said L. Tur-OD, chair of TI Mongolia.

This new law if approved will undermine the authority of the IAAC.

In May 2015, Transparency International Mongolia signed a memorandum with the IAAC to work constructively with the IAAC to push for improvements, monitor its performance and advocate for a more enabling environment.

Correction: Former Prime Minister N. Altankkuyag is not under investigation by the IAAC. The above statement has been amended to clarify this point. 


For any press enquiries please contact

Batbayar Ochirbat
+97670120012
Transparency International Mongolia
Room 1
Zorig San Building
Peace Avenue 17
Ulaanbaatar 210646
Mongolia

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