New Zealand Tops 2013 Corruption Perceptions Index

Issued by Transparency International New Zealand



The Transparency International Secretariat in Berlin today released its annual Corruption Perceptions Index. The Index, which ranks the public sector of 177 countries across the world according to perception of corruption, has consistently shown New Zealand as a country with a strong reputation for clean government. In 2013, New Zealand ties with Denmark for first place due to strong access to information systems and rules governing the behaviour of those in public positions.

Welcoming this recognition for New Zealand, the local chapter of Transparency International is promising that its soon to be released assessment of New Zealand’s integrity, Integrity Plus New Zealand 2013 National Integrity System Assessment, will provide a more detailed report on the country’s vulnerability to corruption.

Chair of Transparency International New Zealand, and Co-Chair of the National Integrity System assessment, Suzanne Snively said, “The annual perceptions index ranks New Zealand highly. Our collective role now is to ensure the reality and the perception match.

“The ambitious National Integrity System assessment to be released on 9 December gives the most comprehensive answer yet to the question, ‘What factors cause New Zealand to rank consistently at the top and in which areas are we weak?”

The National Integrity Assessment will provide a measure on how well various state and other institutions contribute to preventing or mitigating corrupt activities. Transparency International’s is running a ruler over institutions such as Parliament, political parties, the judiciary, the public service, the watchdog organisations, media and the private business sector to assess where the integrity of New Zealand society and government is both strongest and weakest.

Ms Snively said “New Zealanders are recognizing that not only is this perception ranking of our integrity a source of pride, it represents a significant competitive advantage and economic benefits for New Zealand business.

“The extent to which our income producing sectors can leverage the potential offered from this enhanced reputation will however be determined by how we actively protect and treasure our reputation.

“Valuing our country's integrity based on perceptions of others is one thing; however having our integrity valued by our actions and deeds is a completely different matter. It is up to us all to ensure we promote good governance and ethical practices in our region”.

Notes for Editors

1. Transparency International New Zealand (TINZ) research to be released on 9 December outlines New Zealand’s integrity challenges and offers recommendations for better transparency, accountability and integrity.

2. Transparency International is a global civil society coalition leading the fight against corruption. It compiles a number of measures of different aspects of corruption including the Corruption Perceptions Index, the Global Corruption Barometer, and the Bribe Payers Index. Information on Transparency International can be found at www.transparency.org and detailed information on the Corruption Perceptions Index can be found at www.transparency.org/cpi

3. Transparency International New Zealand is the local chapter of Transparency International and is an independent registered charity. Information about TINZ, including the National Integrity System assessment can be found at www.transparency.org.nz.


For any press enquiries please contact

Suzanne Snively
T: +64 21 925 689
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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