New report finds Afghan government’s anti-corruption efforts insufficient for its SDG committments

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



The Afghan government’s anti-corruption efforts are insufficient to achieve the targets set out by the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), according to a new report by Transparency International.

Adopted by 193 nations, the SDGs seek to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all by 2030. Recognising that peace, justice and strong institutions underpin sustainable development across the SDG framework, from healthcare and education to economic growth and clean energy, the international community has committed to a series of ambitious governance targets under Goal 16.

Tackling corruption is an integral part of Goal 16, all the more so in countries such as Afghanistan, where corruption’s role in undermining peace and security threatens to severely limit the country’s potential for sustainable development.

To assess Afghanistan’s progress in achieving key anti-corruption targets in the SDGs, Transparency International has today issued a report titled Policy, SDGs and Fighting Corruption for the People. The report evaluates the country’s efforts on three key Goal 16 targets relating to corruption:

“Without a government that is serious about beating corruption, Afghanistan is unlikely to meet its SDG commitments of ending poverty, securing peace and ensuring an inclusive society,” said Rukshana Nanayakkara, advocacy manager at Transparency International. “Where resources allocated to essential services are pocketed by the corrupt, the poor and vulnerable will be hit the hardest, making a mockery of the 2030 Agenda’s ambition to ‘leave no-one behind’. Where illicit flows in finance and arms are not robustly tackled, counter-terrorist and counter-narcotics measures will be ineffective. Where bribery is the norm in business transactions, firms will be reluctant to invest in the country.”

The Transparency International report makes a series of recommendations that the National Unity Government should prioritise in order to curb corruption:

“Afghanistan is among the 193 countries that have adopted the SDGs, but fighting corruption does not seem to have been given the attention it deserves in the Afghan government’s SDG implementation plan,” commented Nanayakkara. “Corruption has not been openly discussed in public consultation processes on the SDG plan and it is unclear what the plan’s targets and indicators concerning corruption will look like. Given that Afghanistan’s sustainable development – and capacity to achieve its SDG commitments – is inextricably linked with the country’s ability to tackle corruption, the plan should set out clear, measurable steps to address all aspects of corruption covered in the Goal 16 targets.”

Read the report, Policy, SDGs and Fighting Corruption for the People here.

Notes for editors

SDG shadow reports:

These reports provide independent analysis to complement and scrutinise official government progress reports related to SDGs 16.4, 16.5 and 16.10. For the 2017 round of Voluntary National Reviews conducted by national governments, Transparency International chapters and partners in 12 of countries (Argentina, Afghanistan, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, Jordan, the Maldives, Nigeria, Portugal and Peru) produced civil society parallel reports based on a common methodology to assess their government’s progress towards Goal 16.

The other reports can be found here:


For any press enquiries please contact

Julius Hinks
T: +49 30 3438 20 666
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Latest

Support Transparency International

Anti-Corruption Award 2018 - Nominations Open!

Our Anti-Corruption Award recognises the courage and determination of the many individuals and organisations fighting corruption around the world.

Nominate an anti-corruption hero today! 

After Gürtel, what next for Spain’s struggle with political corruption?

At the start of June, the Spanish parliament voted to oust Prime Minister Rajoy after his political party was embroiled in the biggest corruption scandal in Spain’s democratic history. At this critical juncture in Spain’s struggle with political corruption, Transparency International urges all parties to join forces against impunity and support anti-corruption efforts in public life.

Risk of impunity increases with outcome of Portuguese-Angolan corruption trial

A verdict last week by the Lisbon Court of Appeals in the trial of former Angolan vice president Manuel Vicente has disappointed hopes for a triumph of legal due process over politics and impunity. It also has worrying implications for the independence of Portugal’s judiciary.

The UK just made it harder for the corrupt to hide their wealth offshore

If counted together, the United Kingdom and its Overseas Territories and Crown dependencies would rank worst in the world for financial secrecy. Fortunately, this could soon change.

The new IMF anti-corruption framework: 3 things we’ll be looking for a year from now

Last Sunday, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) unveiled its long-awaited framework for “enhanced” engagement with countries on corruption and governance issues. Here are three aspects we at Transparency International will be looking at closely in coming months as the new policy is rolled out.

While the G20 drags its feet, the corrupt continue to benefit from anonymous company ownership

The corrupt don’t like paper trails, they like secrecy. What better way to hide corrupt activity than with a secret company or trust as a front? You can anonymously open bank accounts, make transfers and launder dirty money. If the company is not registered in your name, it can't always be traced back to you.

Urging leaders to act against corruption in the Americas

The hot topic at the 2018 Summit of the Americas is how governments can combat corruption at the highest levels across North and South America.

The impact of land corruption on women: insights from Africa

As part of International Women’s Day, Transparency International is launching the Women, Land and Corruption resource book. This is a collection of unique articles and research findings that describe and analyse the prevalence of land corruption in Africa – and its disproportionate effect on women – presented together with innovative responses from organisations across the continent.

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media