Most fans don’t believe Gianni Infantino’s first year has won back trust in FIFA

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



Transparency International and Forza Football survey 25,000 fans from over 50 countries:

Following the one year anniversary of Gianni Infantino being elected as FIFA President, Transparency International (www.transparency.org), the world’s leading anti-corruption movement, has for the third year in a row teamed-up with fan opinion platform Forza Football (www.forzafootball.com), to gauge international football fans’ views on FIFA.

Fans from over 50 countries were asked whether they think Infantino has restored trust in FIFA, if they think the organisation is actively working against corruption in football, whether they have confidence in FIFA, which area of corruption concerns them the most, and whether they approve or disapprove of Russia hosting the 2018 World Cup.

Although the results, which can be found below, show that football fans lack trust in FIFA, Infantino has made some progress in winning around public opinion. In both 2015 and 2016, a staggering 69 percent of fans said they had no confidence in FIFA under former president Sepp Blatter. This year’s survey has found that 53 per cent still have no confidence in FIFA.

Fans are concerned with corruption in the organisation, but crucially do not feel that FIFA is doing enough to solve this issue. Fans across the world do not approve of 2018 World Cup in Russia, and do not think that Infantino has done enough to restore faith in FIFA.

Patrik Arnesson, CEO and co-founder of Forza Football, comments: “It is worrying to see that, for the second year in a row, the majority of the fans across the world do not have confidence in FIFA. The organisation, which last year hit an all-time low, should speak for the fans, but it is clear that this isn't the case, since only 32 per cent of supporters have faith. The fans also disapprove of the 2018 World Cup in Russia, while only 3 per cent say that corruption in FIFA doesn't worry them. We have reached out to FIFA to ask if they would like our help so that they can better understand fan opinion. We are still waiting for their reply. We hope that they get back to us so that together we can help restore faith in the world’s most popular sport, and make it a better place for fans across the world.”

Cobus de Swardt, Special Representative at Transparency International, adds: “It takes more than words to win back trust. A year is a short time to turn around an organisation that had become synonymous with corruption, so we wait for more concrete actions. Sponsors haven’t flocked back to FIFA because of its reputation and the World Cup in Russia will be a test of its principles in action.”

Infantino trust graphic

Country highlights: 38 per cent of Italians, 32 per cent of Colombians, and 31 per cent of Thais voted YES. 71 per cent of Dutch, 66 per cent of Germans, and 60 per cent of Austrians voted NO. 58 per cent of British and 45 per cent of US fans said that they do not think Infantino has restored faith.

FIFA against corruption graphic

Country highlights: 70 per cent of Germans, 65 per cent of Austrians, and 63 per cent of French do not feel that FIFA is actively working against corruption. 55 per cent of British and 45 per cent of US also voted NO. But 50 per cent of Thais, 47 per cent of South Africans, and 44 per cent of Costa Ricans believe that the organisation is doing enough.

Last year’s Transparency International and Forza Football survey found that 69 per cent of fans across the world didn’t have confidence in FIFA. This shows that, following the departure of Sepp Blatter, fewer fans distrust the organisation. But the fact that over half the fans still lack confidence in FIFA signifies there is much work to be done.

Confidence in FIFA graphic

Country highlights: 25 per cent more Italians, 22 per cent more Costa Ricans, 15 per cent more US, and 8 per cent more British voters have gained confidence in FIFA now as compared to last year.

71 per cent of Chileans, 70 per cent of Germans, and 70 per cent of Dutch voters expressed they do not have confidence in FIFA this year.

57 per cent of Thais, 46 per cent of Italians, and 44 per cent of Japanese voters expressed that they do have confidence in FIFA.


FIFA areas of corruption

Voters were allowed to choose more than one. Below are the percentage of fans that responded to each individual area.

97 per cent of fans are worried about corruption in football. Nearly three quarters of Italians are most worried about match fixing. British fans are most concerned about match fixing, too, along with bribery of officials (60 per cent). 67 per cent of US fans are most worried about the bribery of officials.

FIFA Russia 2018 graphic

Country highlights: 71 per cent of Irish, 69 per cent of Dutch, and 68 per cent of both Swedish and British voters are opposed to Russia hosting the 2018 World Cup. In the US, 47 per cent of voters disagree with the decision.

Not surprisingly, 89 per cent of Russians approve of the decision with 57 per cent of Colombians, and 56 per cent of South Africans also approving.


For any press enquiries please contact

Transparency International
Deborah Unger
T: +44 7432166622
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Forza Football
Andrew Skinner
T: +44 7894 274 899
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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