Millennium Development Goals are unreachable without commitment to fighting corruption

Corruption a key obstacle to development, undermining material well-being and social justice

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



There will be no fair world, no abolition of extreme poverty, as long as the calculus of corruption undermines education, health, trade and the environment. Dramatic reduction of corruption levels is the responsibility of poor and wealthy nations alike.

“Corruption is a massive drag on efforts to reach the Millennium Development Goals. It means wasted money, time and, ultimately, lives,” said Transparency International Chief Executive David Nussbaum. “Governments, especially those of the G8, need to move beyond paying lip service to the principles of accountability and transparency if they are determined to improve the lives of millions who live in poverty and instability.”

Research has demonstrated unquestionably that corruption exacerbates and promotes a raft of development problems. Among them:

Entrenched poverty and hunger (MDG 1)

Corruption hampers economic growth, keeps countries from capitalising on internal resources and reduces aid effectiveness, contributing significantly to hunger and malnutrition. Petty bribery hits the poor hardest, ensuring that they stay poor.

Example: The total volume of bribes paid annually has been estimated by the World Bank Institute at US$ 1 trillion, nearly twice the gross domestic product for Africa, put at less than US$ 600 billion for 1999 by the African Development Bank.

Children deprived of primary education (MDG 2 & 3)

Misallocation of resources due to corruption means schools are never built, or that education systems remain drastically under capacity. Further, corrupt education officials at all levels have often been found to abuse their position as gate-keepers, making good education dependent on capacity to pay bribes.

Example: According to CIET International, 86% of parents polled in Nicaragua reported paying mandatory “contributions” to teachers. Of the mere 47% of girls who managed to get into primary school in a Pakistani province, nearly all reported unofficial demands for money.

Fatalities from treatable illness, child mortality, death in childbirth (MDG 4, 5 & 6)

Misallocation means hospitals are poorly staffed and resourced. Corruption facilitates circulation of fake – potentially lethal – drugs. Bribes are often a prerequisite for access to health care, including maternal health.

Example: In Bangalore the average patient in a maternity ward pays approximately US $22 in bribes to receive adequate medical care. In Nigeria there have been countless cases of deaths due to counterfeit medications that moved unhindered from production plants, across national borders and into unsuspecting markets.

Unsustainable development (MDG 7)

Corrupt public officials mean that environmental regulations remain unenforceable, resulting in lost livelihood, illness and social displacement for millions.

Example: Illegal logging facilitated by bribery is deforesting Asia’s Pacific Rim. With all its attendant environmental, social and health-related consequences this is a serious threat to local populations.

Impeded economic growth (MDG 1 & 8)

Corruption means greater business risks. It distorts markets and discourages foreign direct investment. It stifles cross-border trade.

Example: In Africa, rampant border and duty corruption deprives countries of the benefits of regional trade as a launch pad to the global market.

###

TI is the leading global non-governmental organization devoted to the fight against corruption.


For any press enquiries please contact

Jesse Garcia

Inés Selvood
Tel: +49-30-3438 20-19/45
Mobile: +49 162 419 6454
Fax: +49-30-3470 3912
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Latest

Support Transparency International

Asylum for Sale: Refugees say some U.N. workers demand bribes for resettlement

A 7-month investigation found reports of UN staff members exploiting refugees desperate for a safe home in a new country. By Journalists for Transparency reporter Sally Hayden. 

The trillion dollar question: the IMF and anti-corruption one year on

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has made public commitments and adopted a new framework to address corruption - we check how the IMF is progressing with this one year later.

Three years after the Panama Papers: progress on horizon

The explosive Pulitzer Prize-winning global media project known as the "Panama Papers" turned three years old, and there are many reasons to celebrate.

Call for papers: the Global Asset Registry workshop – Paris, July 1-2

ICRICT, the World Inequality Lab project, Tax Justice Network, and Transparency International are co-hosting a workshop to develop the framework for a Global Asset Registry in Paris on July 1-2. The organisers wish to invite original, high-quality papers for presentation.

Troika Laundromat signals a different kind of financial crisis

The Troika Laundromat investigation shines a spotlight on a cast of new and familiar characters in the ongoing saga surrounding flows of dirty money through the world’s financial system.

الأبعاد الخطيرة للتعديلات الدستورية المقترحة في مصر

يتأهب نواب البرلمان المصري للمصادقة على سلسلة من التعديلات الدستورية، التي ستؤدي في حال تمريرها إلى ترسيخ مزيد من السلطة بيد الرئيس، وتنصيب الجيش مجددا كأعلى سلطة في البلاد.

The alarming message of Egypt’s constitutional amendments

Parliamentarians in Egypt look set to approve a series of constitutional amendments this week that, if passed, would consolidate power in the office of the president, while restoring the military as the ultimate authority in the country.

Восточная Европа и Центральная Азия: слабая система сдержек и противовесов

Индекс восприятия коррупции (ИВК) за этот год представляет печальную картину касательно мер по борьбе с коррупцией в Восточной Европе и Центральной Азии. За несколько лет в этом регионе был достигнут очень незначительный прогресс в борьбе с коррупцией.

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media