Kosovars ready to protest against corruption

Issued by Kosova Democratic Institute



According to the Global Corruption Barometer by Transparency International (TI), 66 % of respondents in Kosovo believe that the level of corruption has increased greatly, while 26% of them think that it has remained the same. Meanwhile, about 67% of the respondents confirmed that the public sector corruption remains a serious problem in the country.

Disturbing also remains the high presence of corruption and its growth in key sectors, where the judiciary is ranked first, followed by Political Parties, Health Services, Assembly, Business, Education System and Civil Service. Meanwhile, regarding bribery, respondents point out that most of them (16%) have paid bribes to the health sector, followed by 12% judiciary, 6% to the police, 4% to services for registration and permits, and 3% to the education system and tax authorities.

Regarding the level of corruption, in comparison to the region, Kosovo and Albania has the highest level of percentage, 66%, followed by 65% in Bosnia, 41% in Macedonia, 21% in Croatia 21 %, and 8% in Serbia of those who believe that corruption has increased. In all these countries, sectors which are located very close to the extreme level of corruption remain:  political parties, judiciary, health services, the Parliament and the Public Sector.

Merita Mustafa, KDI project manager, said that the increase which reflects the level of corruption in this survey clearly shows that any action taken by the current Government and other responsible institutions thus far has not been sufficient because it is not designed in such a way to produce concrete results which could diminish corruption. This data is confirmed by the citizens themselves, because 73% of them believe that the government's actions in the fight against corruption are ineffective. Furthermore, 95% of them have already confirmed that they will sign the petition and, 85% of them are willing to join the peaceful protests against corruption.

Mustafa also stressed that the citizen’s responses to this barometer are crucial information which should be taken very seriously by the government and other responsible institutions, because the latter is evidence that the mechanisms and laws designed to combating corruption in our country, have failed. The presence of high corruption in key institutions, we suggest that it is chocking Kosovo, making it seem internationally as a country with a high level of crime, corruption and other negative phenomena which is destroying the image of the country globally. This report, confirms once more that citizens have no government and proper institutions which are committed and prepared to fight this phenomenon. All these data are an indicator that produces an extremely negative image for our country. This bad image will affect all honorable and respectable citizens and especially the poor.

However, being aware of the fact that not fighting corruption will bring even greater damage to the country, KDI calls on the Government and other responsible institutions to put aside their personal interests and to take all necessary steps, to build actual capacities and policies in combating corruption and building a country with a rule of law. Knowing the fact that the Judiciary is one of the most corrupt sectors in the country, we urge the Judicial Council and all other relevant bodies, to be more persistent and vocal regarding sanctioning of corrupt judges and requiring of adequate conditions, which would guarantee a fair and independent justice system.

Global Corruption Barometer of Transparency International is the only public opinion poll that reveals people's views and experiences of corruption. This survey reflects the responses of 114.270 people in 107 countries around the world, including Kosovo.


For any press enquiries please contact

Merita Mustafa
+ 381 38 248 038
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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