Government not transparent about public procurement

Issued by Kosova Democratic Institute



Kosova Democratic Institute (KDI), a branch of Transparency International in Kosova issued the findings of the “Public Procurement Transparency Index” in a roundtable discussion. This report assesses the disclosure of procurement documents and information by the Government of Kosovo. The index consists of 23 indicators across five categories of public procurement, namely: access to public documents, budgetary transparency, procurement transparency, transparency in public auctions, and complaints to the procurement review body.  

Artan Canhasi, program manager at KDI, stated that “the lack of transparency by Kosovo’s institutions in the public procurement sector affects negatively businesses in Kosovo and the economic development of the country itself”. He added “that there are two types of businesses: those that do not know what, when and how much the government will procure and those that receive inside information through favours, which then use it as advantage to make a bid”.

The findings of this index show that critical documents are not published on web-sites of ministries. Budget, financial reports, procurement plans, but also tender and auction announcements are not accessible online. In assessing the level of transparency in public procurement KDI tested the access to public information through official requests. The findings are included in the report. Out of the 20 institutions, 9 responded within the legal deadlines, nine were late in their response and two ministries did not respond at all to the requests. The author Isuf Zejna from KDI stated that “the Government of Kosovo for 2014 demonstrated a low level of transparency on public procurement. Citizens, media and businesses were not provided documents which are essential for public procurement”.

Ilaz Duli, a board member Public Procurement Regulatory Commission, the body responsible for the development and supervision of the public procurement system, stated that electronic procurement which will be implemented during 2015 will address the majority of issues presented in the report. E-procurement is a longstanding recommendation made by civil society organisations in Kosovo but that has been delayed for several years.

On the other hand, the Chair of the Parliamentary Committee on Public Accounts, another panelist at the discussion emphasised the need for more transparency on public financial management. While Fidan Kalaja, the representative of FOL, said that the reason for such a low level of transparency is corruptive activates by senior politicians.   

The ensuing debate concluded that there is a need to improve the legal basis to enforce transparency of public documents regarding public procurement and avoid legal collisions that currently exist. Another main conclusion resulting from the roundtable discussion was the need to further asses the transparency in public procurement in regular basis to check if there is improvement in this regard.

The full report with the findings can be downloaded in the KDI webpage: www.kdi-kosova.org  

This activity was funded by British Embassy in Prishtina, as part of the project “Transparency and Accountability in Public Procurement”.


For any press enquiries please contact

T: +381 (0)38 248 038
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Latest

Support Transparency International

Apply Now for Transparency International School on Integrity!

Apply today for the Transparency School 2018 and spend an insightful week with anti-corruption enthusiasts from all over the world!

Blog: Making Summits Meaningful: A How to Guide for Heads of Government

Heads of Government spend a lot of time in glitzy international summits. World leaders shouldn't fly around the world just for a photo op or to announce new commitments they have no intention of keeping. Here's is a how-to guide for Heads of Government to make summits meaningful.

While the G20 drags its feet, the corrupt continue to benefit from anonymous company ownership

The corrupt don’t like paper trails, they like secrecy. What better way to hide corrupt activity than with a secret company or trust as a front? You can anonymously open bank accounts, make transfers and launder dirty money. If the company is not registered in your name, it can't always be traced back to you.

Urging leaders to act against corruption in the Americas

The hot topic at the 2018 Summit of the Americas is how governments can combat corruption at the highest levels across North and South America.

The impact of land corruption on women: insights from Africa

As part of International Women’s Day, Transparency International is launching the Women, Land and Corruption resource book. This is a collection of unique articles and research findings that describe and analyse the prevalence of land corruption in Africa – and its disproportionate effect on women – presented together with innovative responses from organisations across the continent.

Passport dealers of Europe: navigating the Golden Visa market

Coast or mountains? Real estate or business investment? Want your money back in five years? If you're rich, there are an array of options for European ‘Golden Visas’ at your fingertips, each granting EU residence or citizenship rights.

How the G20 can make state-owned enterprises champions of integrity

For the first time in its presidency of the G20, Argentina is hosting country representatives from across the globe to address the best ways of curtailing corruption and promoting integrity in state-owned enterprises (SOEs).

Europe and Central Asia: More civil engagement needed (Part II)

As follow-up to the regional analysis of Eastern Europe and Central Asia, additional examples from Albania, Kosovo and Georgia highlight the need for more progress in anti-corruption efforts in these countries and across the region.

Lutte contre la corruption en Afrique: Du bon et du moins bon

La publication de la dernière édition de l’Indice de perception de la corruption (IPC) offre un bon point de repère pour situer les efforts de lutte contre la corruption que l’Union africaine (UA) poursuivra tout au long de 2018

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media

Would you like to know more?

Sign up to stay informed about corruption news and our work around the world