EULEX needs to support not intimidate whistleblowers

Issued by Kosova Democratic Institute



In light of the developments pertaining to Maria Bamieh, former prosecutor and whistleblower for alleged mismanagements in the EU Rule of Law Mission- EULEX, Transparency International Kosova requests that EULEX publishes the procedures for reporting fraud and protection of whistleblowers. This is so that cases of corruption or misuse of power within this Institution, or other Institutions where EULEX operates, are made public in order to combat and prevent such abuses.

In November 2014, Maria Bamieh publically alleged that some of her colleagues at EULEX had engaged in unlawful actions and that her requests for internal investigations were ignored by the Mission. Currently, Bamieh has filed a case at the London Employment Tribunal, against EULEX for victimisation and being forced from her job due to whistleblowing activities.

According to lawyers who represent Ms. Bamieh, EULEX has threatened criminal prosecution if she or her lawyer disclose any details of her claim to any non-parties pertaining to the court case and have requested complete secrecy throughout all stages of the proceedings.

EULEX is a mission that is funded by European taxpayers with the aim to fight corruption in Kosovo, thus there is a high public interest that the developments of this case are made public and easily accessible to the public and media.

The threat made to Bamieh by EULEX constitutes intimidation of anyone who could come forward to denounce corruption or mismanagement.

EULEX should set the example of how a whistleblower should be treated to improve the current situation rather than send a message that anyone speaking up about corruption faces the threat of prosecution.

EULEX’s attempts to enforce secrecy could stop other witnesses to abuses from coming forward.

EULEX should dedicate its energy to strengthening Kosovo’s institutions and set a good example of action and not intimidation of whistleblowers in Kosovo.


For any press enquiries please contact

Edita Mustafa
Coordinator of Programs
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: +381 (0) 38 248 038
Mobile: +389 (0) 49 171 906

Latest

Support Transparency International

Is Hungary’s assault on the rule of law fuelling corruption?

In June 2018, Hungary’s parliament passed a series of laws that criminalise any individual or group that offers help to an illegal immigrant. The laws continued worrying trends in the public arena that began with the rise to power of the Fidesz party in 2010. What are these trends, and what do they mean for the fight against corruption and the rule of law in Hungary?

Will the G20 deliver on anti-corruption in 2018?

This week, activists from civil society organisations all over the world gathered in Buenos Aires, Argentina for the sixth annual Civil 20 (C20) summit.

Returning Nigerians’ stolen millions

The stakes are high in the planned distribution of $322 million in stolen Nigerian public money.

Three priorities at the Open Government Partnership summit

Transparency International has been at the Open Government Partnership's global summit in Tbilisi, Georgia, pushing for action in three key areas.

Civil society’s crucial role in sustainable development

Key players in the development community are meeting in New York for the main United Nations conference on sustainable development, the High-Level Political Forum (HLPF). Transparency International is there to highlight how corruption obstructs development and report on how effectively countries are tackling this issue.

Comment gagner la lutte contre la corruption en Afrique

Aujourd’hui est la Journée africaine de lutte contre la corruption – une occasion opportunité pour reconnaitre le progrès dans la lutte contre la corruption en Afrique et le travail significatif qui reste encore à accomplir.

How to win the fight against corruption in Africa

African Anti-Corruption Day is an important opportunity to recognise both the progress made in the fight against corruption in Africa and the significant work still left to do.

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media