Corruption Watch joins civil society call for day of mobilisation

Issued by Corruption Watch



Corruption Watch, in this week of multiple calls for action in response to recent cabinet shifts as well as the ratings downgrade, urges the public to join the march from the treasury building on Church Square to the Union Buildings on Friday, 7 April 2017.

South Africa is facing an unprecedented political, economic and social crisis, and the common denominator which threatens to tear the country apart is corruption. 

The organisation has long drawn attention to the effects of corruption on the broader society, highlighting in particular key institutions such as parastatals besieged by allegations of corruption. These include Prasa, Eskom, the SABC and SAA, as well as government departments and their delivery partners, for example the Department of Social Development and Sassa, and the anxiety caused by the fiasco surrounding the delivery of social grants. 

Add to this the recent reports of currency fixing by rogue elements within the banking sector, and it becomes clear that across the public and private sectors, there is an environment that is conducive for corruption to flourish.

David Lewis, executive director of Corruption Watch, commented: “We don’t enter the political terrain lightly. However, we face a political, economic and social crisis of an unprecedented scale and depth. At the root of this is corruption manifesting particularly in the capture of the Presidency. While the removal of Zuma will not, by any means, solve all of our problems, it has become clear that none can be solved as long as he remains head of state.”

Corruption Watch calls upon the public to join forces with the civil society initiative to take a stand against the unravelling of our society and to demand that President Zuma step down or be removed from office. Details of the march on Friday are as follows:

Date:                     07 April 2017
Time:                    10h00 marchers assemble / 12h00 depart
Venue:                  Church Square, Pretoria

Participants will march from Church Square to the Union Buildings to deliver a strong message of no confidence.


For any press enquiries please contact

Patience Mkosana: +27 72 992 8380
Moira Campbell: +27 83 995 4711

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