Attacks on civil society and journalists on the rise in Europe

Transparency Germany, the PEN Centre Germany, Reports without Borders Germany and Amnesty International Germany call for greater space and security for civil society

Issued by Transparency International Germany



Translations: DE


Frankfurt am Main - Transparency International Germany, the PEN Centre Germany, Reporters Without Borders Germany and Amnesty International Germany today called on the German Federal Government to work at the national and EU level to support civil society organisations and protect journalists. Shrinking space for civil society hampers the fight against grievances like corruption and human rights violations and threatens the freedom of expression and the freedom of the press in general.

State-supported attacks on civil society increase

Recent years have seen a worrying trend: State-supported attacks on civil society are increasing, while space for organisations and journalists that are critical of governments is shrinking. It is particularly alarming that governments in some EU member states - especially in Central and Eastern Europe - are increasingly putting civil society under pressure with so-called "NGO laws". As a consequence, civil society organisations are deprived of their funding or even dissolved, and critics are forced into exile. The political climate in many countries has deteriorated dramatically to the detriment of civil society organisations and social movements.

Hartmut Bäumer, Chair of Transparency Germany, commented: "Effective anti-corruption measures need a strong civil society. The German federal government must make sure that governments that trample on the rule of law in their countries and suppress dissenting voices do not remain in control of financial support from the EU.”

Julia Duchrow, Head of the Politics and Activism Unit of Amnesty International in Germany adde: "We are increasingly facing such developments in member states of the European Union, for example in Italy, where maritime rescuers are criminalized, or in Hungary, where support of refugees, for example through legal advice, is punishable. At the same time, we are seeing substantial attacks on the rule of law in Poland and Hungary calling into question the independence of the judiciary and thus the protection of civil society."

Freedom of the press and expression in danger

Free, independent media are essential pillars of a democratic society and indispensable for uncovering corruption. According to Reporters Without Borders Germany, the situation of press freedom in Europe in 2018 has deteriorated like in hardly any other region of the world. Journalists in Europe are still among the world’s freest and safest. But even in EU member states, media workers were assaulted or even murdered last year, and authorities lack the will to clarify such crimes.

"Not only the cruel murder of investigative journalist and blogger Daphne Caruana Galizia, but also the Maltese authorities' lack of ambition to explain, has shown how much the rule of law in an EU country has been eroded by corruption.", said the Vice President of the PEN Centre Germany, Ralf Nestmeyer.

"Organised crime, a corrupt judiciary, politicians and security authorities, who often benefit from criminal networks themselves, are fuelling a cycle of impunity time and time again: if no punishment is imminent, imitators feel encouraged. To break this vicious circle, political pressure from the outside is essential”, said Michael Rediske, board member of Reporters Without Borders Germany.

Lack of legal certainty in Germany

Civil society in Germany is hampered by initiatives to deprive non-profit status and attempts to restrict the rights of associations to take legal action. In February 2019, the Federal Finance Court (BFH) denied the non-profit status of Attac, stating that the organization had neglected "political openness" in its campaigns. This decision leads to a serious uncertainty for civil society. The decision of the BFH is relevant for a large number of other politically active organizations, which now have to fear losing their non-profit status. The non-profit status is of fundamental democratic importance and the loss would be a threat to the existence of many civil society organizations.

German Federal Minister of Finance, Olaf Scholz, has announced that he will present a bill in October 2019 to amend the non-profit status law.

Responding to this, Hartmut Bäumer said: "We expect the Federal Minister of Finance to create legal certainty for politically active organisations. Civil society organisations in Germany must be allowed to express themselves politically within the framework of the free democratic constitution."

###

Notes to Editors

Transparency International Germany invites you to the event "Criticism not welcome? Civil society under pressure“ at the Frankfurt Book Fair 2019. The panel will include:

Hartmut Bäumer will moderate the discussion. The event will take place in English and German on Saturday, 19 October 2019 at 4 p.m., on the stage of the World Reception (B 81 in Hall 4.1).

Hartmut Bäumer and Ralf Nestmeyer will be available for talks and interviews on Saturday, 19 October 2019 at 12 p.m. at the booth of the PEN Centre Germany (D 92 in Hall 4.1).

Amnesty International Germany invites you to a talk with the award-winning journalist Humayra Bakthiyar from Tajikistan living in exile in Germany on Sunday, 20 October 2019, at 11 a.m. At 12.30 p.m., the event "Rights at stake in Bangladesh" will be held in English with human rights defenders Hana Shams Ahmed and Jyotirmoy Barua. Both talks will take place at the Amnesty Mobile (Hall Agora / Ago E11).


For any press enquiries please contact

Transparency International Germany

Hartmut Bäumer, Chair
Sylvia Schwab, Press officer
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: 030 - 54 98 98 0
Mobile: 0157 - 566 283 96

PEN Centre Germany
Felix Hille, Press and public relations
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: 06151 - 62708 23
Mobil: 0157 - 313 826 37

Reporters Without Borders
Jennifer Schiementz, Press Office
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: 030 60989533-55


PRESS RELEASE

Transparency Deutschland, PEN Centre Germany, Reports without Borders Germany and Amnesty International Germany call for greater space and security for civil society

Frankfurt am Main, 19 October 2019 - Transparency International Germany, the PEN Centre Germany, Reporters Without Borders Germany and Amnesty International Germany today called on the German Federal Government to work at the national and EU level to support civil society organisations and protect journalists. Shrinking space for civil society hampers the fight against grievances like corruption and human rights violations and threatens the freedom of expression and the freedom of the press in general.

Civil Society under pressure – even in EU member states

We are facing a disturbing trend over recent years: State-supported attacks on civil society are on the increase, while space for organisations and journalists that are critical of governments is shrinking. It is particularly alarming that governments in some EU member states - especially in Central and Eastern Europe - are increasingly putting civil society under pressure with so-called “NGO laws”. As a consequence, civil society organisations are deprived of their funding or dissolved, and critics go into exile. The political climate in many countries has deteriorated dramatically to the detriment of civil society organisations and social movements.

Hartmut Bäumer, Chair of Transparency Germany, commented: “Effective anti-corruption measures need a strong civil society. The German federal government must make sure that governments that trample on the rule of law in their countries and suppress dissenting voices do not remain in control of financial support from the EU.”

Julia Duchrow, Head of Politics and Activism Unit of Amnesty International in Germany: “More and more we are facing such developments in member states of the European Union, for example by the criminalization of maritime rescuers in Italy or in Hungary, where the support of refugees, for example through legal advice, is punishable. At the same time, we are seeing substantial attacks on the rule of law in Poland and Hungary calling into question the independence of the judiciary and thus the protection of civil society.”

Freedom of the press and expression in danger

Free, independent media are essential pillars of a democratic society and indispensable for uncovering corruption. According to Reporters Without Borders Germany, the situation of press freedom in Europe in 2018 has deteriorated as in hardly any other region of the world. Journalists in Europe are still able to work the freest and safest. But even in EU member states media workers were assaulted or even murdered last year, and authorities lack the will to clarify such crimes.

“Not only the cruel murder of investigative journalist and blogger Daphne Caruana Galizia, but also the Maltese authorities’ lack of ambition to explain, has shown how much the rule of law in an EU country has been eroded by forms of corruption that can not be accepted”, said the Vice President of the PEN Centre Germany Ralf Nestmeyer.

“Organized crime, a corrupt judiciary, politicians and security authorities, who often benefit from criminal networks themselves, are fuelling a cycle of impunity time and time again: if no punishment is imminent, imitators must feel encouraged. To break this vicious circle, political pressure from the outside is essential”, said Michael Rediske, board member of Reporters Without Borders Germany.

Lack of legal certainty in Germany

Civil society in Germany is hampered by initiatives to deprive non-profit status and attempts to restrict the rights of associations to take legal action. In February 2019, the Federal Finance Court (BFH) denied the non-profit status of Attac, stating that the organization had neglected “political openness” in its campaigns. This decision leads to a serious uncertainty for civil society. The decision of the BFH is relevant for a large number of other politically active organizations, which now have to fear losing their non-profit status. The non-profit status is of fundamental democratic importance and the loss would be a threat to the existence of many civil society organizations.

The Federal Minister of Finance, Olaf Scholz (SPD), has announced that he will present a bill in October 2019 to amend the non-profit status law.

“We expect the Federal Minister of Finance to create legal certainty for politically active organisations. Civil society organisations in Germany must be allowed to express themselves politically within the framework of the free democratic constitution,” said Bäumer.

Notes to Editors

Transparency International Germany invites you to the event “Criticism not welcome? Civil society under pressure“ at the Frankfurt Book Fair 2019. The panel will include József Péter Martin, Executive Director of Transparency International Hungary, Jürgen Resch, Executive Director of Environmental Action Germany and journalist and author Christian Bommarius. Hartmut Bäumer will moderate the discussion. The event will take place in English and German on Saturday, 19 October 2019, at 4 p.m., on the stage of the World Reception (B 81 in Hall 4.1).

Hartmut Bäumer and Ralf Nestmeyer will be available for talks and interviews on Saturday, 19 October 2019 at 12 noon at the booth of the PEN Centre Germany (D 92 in Hall 4.1).

Amnesty International Germany invites you to a talk with the award-winning journalist Humayra Bakthiyar from Tajikistan living in exile in Germany on Sunday, 20 October 2019, at 11 a.m. At 12.30 p.m., the event “Rights at stake in Bangladesh” will be held in English with human rights defenders Hana Shams Ahmed and Jyotirmoy Barua. Both talks will take place at the Amnesty Mobil (Hall Agora / Ago E11).

Media contacts

Transparency International Germany
Hartmut Bäumer, Chair
Sylvia Schwab, Press office
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: +49 (0)30 - 54 98 98 0
Mobile: +49 (0)157 - 566 283 96

PEN Centre Germany
Felix Hille, Press and public relations
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: +49 (0)6151 - 62708 23
Mobile: +49 (0)157 - 313 826 37

Reporters Without Borders Germany
Jennifer Schiementz, Press Office
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: +49 (0)30 - 60 989 533-55

Amnesty International Germany

Hyun-Ho Cha, Press Officer
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: +49 (0)30 - 420 248-333
Mobile: +49 (0)151 - 527 021 72

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