Anti-corruption school opens its doors in Almaty, Kazakhstan

Issued by Transparency Kazakhstan, Civic Foundation



On 23 April 2014, Almaty’s first nationwide Anti-Corruption School opens its doors for students, civil society representatives, journalists and all citizens who wish to learn how to counteract corruption in daily life.

Transparency International Kazakhstan – with support from the Soros Foundation-Kazakhstan and in partnership with the Agency for Fighting against Economic and Corruption Crimes (the Financial Police), the Financial Police Academy, Turan University, the Kazakhstan Association of Higher Education, and the Republican State Enterprise “Kazakhstan Temir Zholy” – will present a completely new educational format that provides students with anti-corruption instruments and tools, with step-by-step recommendations on how to apply them.

The Anti-Corruption School project aims at promoting the theory and practice of anti-corruption. Over the course of seven days, all students will get the opportunity to work with leading anti-corruption experts, government representatives, businessmen and scientists. They will also get the opportunity to see real-life examples of how to effectively fight corruption. The school’s programme includes four training modules that combine both theoretical and practical courses on topics, such as corruption research and public sector, private sector and civil society participation in combating corruption.

Within the framework of this project, we have also launched an informational campaign “I have a dream” – focusing on children’s dreams about a clean, transparent and just Kazakhstan. All of the words presented in our posters are real expressions of children from Almaty kindergartens. The dreams of these young citizens of Kazakhstan are rather small and these dreams cannot be executed by fairies or by cyber toys. Only we, adults, can make these dreams come true.

We argue that corruption is a part of a culture or lifestyle; that corruption is an integral part of doing business and that ordinary people cannot resist corruption. Corruption is a two-way street – those who give bribes have to be responsible for their actions as well as those who receive bribes.


For any press enquiries please contact

Natalia Malyarchuk, Chair, TI Kazakhstan

T: +7 727 272 69 81
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
W: http://www.transparencykz.org

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