Pilot project brings together football and anti-corruption organisations to help prevent match-fixing through education

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



Logos of Transparency International< DFL, EPFL

The anti-corruption organisation Transparency International (TI), the Association of European Professional Football Leagues (EPFL) and the German Football League (DFL) have joined forces on an 18 month project to help prevent match-fixing through education and awareness-raising.

With the exponential rise in globalised on-line betting, which is estimated to be worth more than $700 billion annually, this pioneering programme aims to safeguard the integrity of sporting competitions and the reputation of the game against the threats of match-fixing , especially related with sports betting.

Called Staying on Side, the aim of the project is to develop educational and prevention programmes and materials that can be used by the football leagues across Europe to address all target groups including young players, professionals, and match officials. It will draw on the experience gained through a project, organised by the DFL and the German Football Association (DFB), in collaboration with Transparency International Germany and the German Health Agency (BZgA) as well as the Professional Footballs Player Union (VdV).

A two-day workshop in Berlin last week brought together experts on the fight against sports betting related match fixing, anti-corruption work, gambling and representatives from a number of European Football Leagues to discuss the role of education in preventing match-fixing.

“An organisation such as Transparency International, which has experience in helping people say no to corruption, can offer support to those in football who have to come to grips with difficult situations. We believe strongly that education and awareness-raising are key to helping solve the problem of match-fixing,” said Sylvia Schenk, senior advisor for sport at Transparency International.

“The EPFL and our Leagues are committed to ensure that our game remains clean from the threats posed by match-fixing and unrestricted and unregulated sports betting. Our members have been implementing and even further developing the measures and best practice recommendations foreseen in the EPFL Code of Conduct on Sports Betting Integrity, and they start with prevention and education. We want to make sure that all key participants in the game – from the youngsters to professional players, including referees, managers and football administrators – are aware and understand fully the risks and dangers, so that incidents of match-fixing, namely those associated with sports betting,  can be better prevented.  That’s also what this pilot project is all about.” said Emanuel Macedo de Medeiros, CEO of the EPFL.

 “At the DFL we strongly believe that education and training especially of younger players is a key element of prevention. We want to create a clear understanding and awareness about the dangers and consequences of match-fixing and gambling addiction in order to protect the players and to improve the fight against match-fixing. Our prevention project, part of which is the appointment of an independent Ombudsman, is a contribution to safeguard the integrity and the credibility of our sport. We are very happy that we can develop it further together with our partners TI and EPFL and with other football leagues in Europe,” said Jürgen Paepke, head of the legal department of DFL.

Note to Editors

Transparency International is the global anti-corruption organisation with more than 100 partner organisations across the world. The TI chapters involved in the project are in the following countries: Germany, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Portugal and United Kingdom.

Contact: Deborah Unger, Manager, Rapid Response Unit

+44 20 8960 2526 or +49 30 3438 20666
dunger@transparency.org

www.transparency.org

 

DFL Deutsche Fussball Liga manages the Bundesliga and 2. Bundesliga, the top two professional football leagues in Germany. Its project, Together Against Match-Fixing, was launched 2010. More information on that project is available here.

Contact: Dr. Dirk Meyer-Bosse, Head of Media and Communications

+49-6-65005-204
dirk.meyer-bosse@bundesliga.de

www.bundesliga.de
 

The EPFL is the umbrella organisation and the common voice of the 30 largest Football Leagues across Europe. It promotes the political, social, cultural, economic and educational dimensions of football and its positive values. The EPFL Code of Conduct on Sports Betting Integrity, which was unanimously approved by all member Leagues, foresees that, among other key measures, all members must put in place educational programmes by 2014. More information on the EPFL Strategic Proposals on Sport Betting is available here

Contact: Alberto Colombo, Head of Marketing, Media & Communications

+41 22 308 5111
alberto.colombo@epfl-europeanleagues.com

www.epfl-europeanleagues.com

 

European Union flag

 

The project is part of a European Commission initiative that has co-funded several different projects in Europe to develop pilot materials and best practice to prevent match-fixing. Click here for more information.


For any press enquiries please contact

Transparency International
Deborah Unger, Manager, Rapid Response Unit
+44 20 8960 2526 or +49 30 3438 20666
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

DFL Deutsche Fussball Liga
Dr. Dirk Meyer-Bosse, Head of Media and Communications
+49 6 65005 204
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

EPFL
Alberto Colombo, Head of Marketing, Media & Communications
+41 22 308 5111                  
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Latest

Support Transparency International

Apply Now for Transparency International School on Integrity!

Apply today for the Transparency School 2018 and spend an insightful week with anti-corruption enthusiasts from all over the world!

Blog: Making Summits Meaningful: A How to Guide for Heads of Government

Heads of Government spend a lot of time in glitzy international summits. World leaders shouldn't fly around the world just for a photo op or to announce new commitments they have no intention of keeping. Here's is a how-to guide for Heads of Government to make summits meaningful.

While the G20 drags its feet, the corrupt continue to benefit from anonymous company ownership

The corrupt don’t like paper trails, they like secrecy. What better way to hide corrupt activity than with a secret company or trust as a front? You can anonymously open bank accounts, make transfers and launder dirty money. If the company is not registered in your name, it can't always be traced back to you.

Urging leaders to act against corruption in the Americas

The hot topic at the 2018 Summit of the Americas is how governments can combat corruption at the highest levels across North and South America.

The impact of land corruption on women: insights from Africa

As part of International Women’s Day, Transparency International is launching the Women, Land and Corruption resource book. This is a collection of unique articles and research findings that describe and analyse the prevalence of land corruption in Africa – and its disproportionate effect on women – presented together with innovative responses from organisations across the continent.

Passport dealers of Europe: navigating the Golden Visa market

Coast or mountains? Real estate or business investment? Want your money back in five years? If you're rich, there are an array of options for European ‘Golden Visas’ at your fingertips, each granting EU residence or citizenship rights.

How the G20 can make state-owned enterprises champions of integrity

For the first time in its presidency of the G20, Argentina is hosting country representatives from across the globe to address the best ways of curtailing corruption and promoting integrity in state-owned enterprises (SOEs).

Europe and Central Asia: More civil engagement needed (Part II)

As follow-up to the regional analysis of Eastern Europe and Central Asia, additional examples from Albania, Kosovo and Georgia highlight the need for more progress in anti-corruption efforts in these countries and across the region.

Lutte contre la corruption en Afrique: Du bon et du moins bon

La publication de la dernière édition de l’Indice de perception de la corruption (IPC) offre un bon point de repère pour situer les efforts de lutte contre la corruption que l’Union africaine (UA) poursuivra tout au long de 2018

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media

Would you like to know more?

Sign up to stay informed about corruption news and our work around the world