Joint media release by TIGI and Private Sector Commission

Issued by Transparency Institute of Guyana Inc.



The Private Sector Commission (PSC) and the national contact of Transparency International (TI) - Transparency Institute of Guyana Inc. (TIGI) met recently at the request of the PSC to discuss the PSC’s concerns about the low ranking of Guyana on TI’s 2012 Annual Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI. TIGI explained that the CPI is a TI global research initiative that ranks countries and territories based on how corrupt their public sector is perceived to be and has been credited with putting corruption on the international policy agenda. TIGI also highlighted that apart from the CPI Guyana is ranked poorly on corruption in a number of other indices from reputable international organizations.

TIGI presented information on the civil society body, its directors, its mandate, the work it does and intends to do. TIGI discussed its eleven point plan for tackling corruption and improving accountability and transparency in Guyana, which was issued at its press release in December announcing the results of the CPI. TIGI expressed the view that if its proposed eleven point plan is implemented then Guyana’s ranking would surely improve on the CPI.  

The PSC expressed concern about the low ranking that Guyana received and its negative impact on business and investment and that, in its view, it was exaggerated. The PSC expressed further concern that the CPI is based on perceptions and not reality, and the methodology used may not be appropriate. TIGI clarified that absolute levels of corruption are difficult to measure since corruption generally comprises illegal activities, which are deliberately hidden and only come to light through scandals, investigations or prosecutions and that the best available substitute measure is the CPI and has been relied upon by most countries and international institutions as an important guide to assessing levels of corruption in a country. Most countries accept the CPI as the best available measure for corruption and readily commit to improving their countries standing.

Both organisations agreed that the perception of corruption of Guyana is too important to be ignored and negatively impacts on business and investment. The PSC agreed with a number of the points in TIGI’s eleven point plan and offered to collaborate on the following.

Both parties agreed that as key stakeholders it was important that the PSC and TIGI collaborate their efforts aimed at eradicating corruption in Guyana and meet regularly to discuss progress as well matters of mutual interest.

 

 


For any press enquiries please contact

Gino Peter Persaud
T: (592)-231-9586
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Latest

Support Transparency International

Is Hungary’s assault on the rule of law fuelling corruption?

In June 2018, Hungary’s parliament passed a series of laws that criminalise any individual or group that offers help to an illegal immigrant. The laws continued worrying trends in the public arena that began with the rise to power of the Fidesz party in 2010. What are these trends, and what do they mean for the fight against corruption and the rule of law in Hungary?

Will the G20 deliver on anti-corruption in 2018?

This week, activists from civil society organisations all over the world gathered in Buenos Aires, Argentina for the sixth annual Civil 20 (C20) summit.

Returning Nigerians’ stolen millions

The stakes are high in the planned distribution of $322 million in stolen Nigerian public money.

Three priorities at the Open Government Partnership summit

Transparency International has been at the Open Government Partnership's global summit in Tbilisi, Georgia, pushing for action in three key areas.

Civil society’s crucial role in sustainable development

Key players in the development community are meeting in New York for the main United Nations conference on sustainable development, the High-Level Political Forum (HLPF). Transparency International is there to highlight how corruption obstructs development and report on how effectively countries are tackling this issue.

Comment gagner la lutte contre la corruption en Afrique

Aujourd’hui est la Journée africaine de lutte contre la corruption – une occasion opportunité pour reconnaitre le progrès dans la lutte contre la corruption en Afrique et le travail significatif qui reste encore à accomplir.

How to win the fight against corruption in Africa

African Anti-Corruption Day is an important opportunity to recognise both the progress made in the fight against corruption in Africa and the significant work still left to do.

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media