Transparency International: Georgia 51st in 2012 Corruption Perceptions Index

Issued by Transparency International Georgia



Georgia ranks 51st in Transparency International’s 2012 Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) which measures perceived public sector corruption in 176 countries. Georgia’s score in the 2012 survey is 52 on a scale of 0 (perceived to be highly corrupt) to 100 (perceived to be very clean).

Georgia currently ranks ahead of several EU member states, including the Czech Republic, Latvia, Slovakia, Romania, and Bulgaria, and slightly below Rwanda, Lithuania, Costa Rica, and Hungary. Georgia shares the 51st place in the ranking with the Seychelles. The 2012 CPI was calculated using an improved methodology which does not allow to compare the data with previous surveys.

The countries with the lowest perceived corruption in 2012 are Denmark, Finland, New Zealand, Sweden and Singapore. Meanwhile, Myanmar, Sudan, Afghanistan, North Korea and Somalia are found at the bottom of the ranking.

Georgia has made significant progress since 2004 in tackling different forms of corruption, including petty bribery which has effectively disappeared from Georgians’ everyday life. The country’s anti-corruption legislation has also improved and transparency of government activities in a number of areas has increased. The most notable examples include the introduction of an innovative electronic procurement system, e-government tools, a database with public official’s asset declarations, and efficient services provided to citizens by public service halls.

At the same time, there have been important gaps in the country’s anti-corruption framework in 2004-2012. The weakness of parliament and the judiciary has undermined the democratic system of checks and balances and resulted in a dominant executive branch. A number of important government agencies, including the Prosecutor’s Office and the State Audit Office, have suffered from a lack of independence from the political leadership and have been used as political tools. Officials at the top of the executive branch have operated without proper accountability and oversight, creating significant opportunities for abuse of power and corruption. Some institutions led by powerful officials have been allowed to bypass existing transparency and accountability mechanisms. An imbalanced system of governance also resulted in extreme politicizing of public bodies, which was particularly evident during the last election campaign.

In order to address these gaps and ensure Georgia’s further progress in the fight against corruption, the Georgian authorities should:

About the CPI:
The CPI scores and ranks countries/territories based on how corrupt a country’s public sector is perceived to be. It is a composite index, a combination of surveys and assessments of corruption, collected by a variety of reputable institutions.

This year’s CPI scores were calculated with a new methodology, which means that the 2012 results are in no way comparable with those from 2011 or earlier years. However, the new methodology will make it possible to compare CPI results from different years from 2012 onwards.

Georgia’s score in the CPI 2012 is based on data from the following surveys:

 

You can find more materials on the CPI on Transparency International’s site.


For any press enquiries please contact

Eka Rostomashvili
T: +9955 77 74 40 00
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Latest

Support Transparency International

Stopping Dirty Money: the Global Effective-O-Meter

As of December 2017, global effectiveness at stopping money laundering stands at 32% effectiveness.

Corruption in the USA: The difference a year makes

A new survey by Transparency International shows that the US government has a long way to go to win back citizens’ trust.

Anti-Corruption Day 2017: Empowering citizens’ fight against corruption

The 9 December, is Anti-corruption Day. A key part of Transparency International’s work is to help people hold their governments to account. Have a look at what we've been doing around the world!

Digital Award for Transparency: Honouring digital initiatives to fight corruption

The Digital Award for Transparency awards individuals and civil society organisations who have developed digital technology tools used to fight corruption. The award aims at strengthening and promoting existing initiatives that promote good governance through three categories: Open Data, Citizen Engagement and Anti-Corruption Tools.

Unearthing corruption risks in mining approvals

From resource-rich West Africans nations, to the mining giants of the Pacific and North America, every time a government signs a deal to allow mining of its natural resources there are corruption risks – no matter where that country is.

TI launches Clean Contracting Manifesto, calls for G20 adoption

Governments spend huge sums of money via public procurement every year yet the concentration of money, government discretion and corporate influence in providing these vital good and services makes it particularly vulnerable to corruption. Transparency International has launched a Clean Contracting Manifesto to ensure that the whole lifecycle of public procurement is transparent, accountable, efficient and in the public interest.

Preventing corruption in state-owned enterprises

In many countries public services such as energy, water, transportation and health care are provided by enterprises either controlled or partly-owned by the government. These state-owned enterprises (SOEs) can be vulnerable to corruption. Transparency International researched ways SOEs can combat corruption - check it out here!

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media

Would you like to know more?

Sign up to stay informed about corruption news and our work around the world