Algerian anti-corruption activist’s release welcomed but detention questioned

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



Transparency International (TI), the global anti-corruption organisation, and the UNCAC Coalition, a 200-strong network of civil society organisations promoting the implementation of the UN Convention against Corruption, welcome the release from prison of Algerian anti-corruption activist Dr. Djilali Hadjadj after nine days’ unnecessary detention. We call on the authorities to guarantee his safety, movement and freedom of speech, as well as those of his family.

Dr. Hadjadj was tried in absentia in May 2010 and sentenced to three years in prison for alleged falsification of medical leave certificates in a case dating back to 2000, while he was working for the Algerian national health service. Without prior notice, he was arrested on 5 September in Constantine as he was about to board a plane for France. He was then transferred to Algiers and detained in solitary confinement.

On 13 September a court upheld the May conviction but reduced the penalty to a six months’ suspended sentence and a US$664 fine. Following the hearing he was released. He has confirmed he will appeal the case.

We welcome the release of Dr. Hadjadj but note that he should not have been detained for nine days.

Transparency International and its network of 90 chapters around the world, as well as the UNCAC Coalition will remain close observers of the next steps in the process.

The arrest of Dr. Hadjadj provoked a wave of protest from international anti-corruption and human rights activists as well as journalist protection organisations.

Dr. Hadjad is a medical doctor and journalist and president of a local anti-corruption organisation, Association Algérienne de lutte Contre la Corruption, which is part of the UNCAC coalition.

 

Transparency International is the global civil society organisation leading the fight against corruption.

The UNCAC Coalition is a network of civil society organisations in 67 countries promoting the ratification, implementation and monitoring of the UN Convention against Corruption.

Note to editors: Previous releases on this subject from TI and the UNCAC Coalition.


For any press enquiries please contact

Deborah Unger, Media and Public Relations Manager
Transparency International
T: +49 30 34 38 20 662
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Latest

Support Transparency International

Everything you need to know about the 18th International Anti-Corruption Conference (#18IACC)

The #18IACC will take place from 22-24 October in Copenhagen, Denmark under the theme Together for Development, Peace and Security: Now is the Time to Act. Get the latest info and updates here!

Risky business: Europe’s golden visa programmes

Are EU Member States accepting too much risk in their investor migration schemes?

Future Against Corruption Award 2018

TI is calling on young people across the globe to join the anti-corruption movement. People between the age of 18 and 35 are invited to submit a short video clip presenting their idea on new ways to fight corruption. Three finalists will be invited to Berlin during the International Anti-Corruption Day festivities to be awarded with the Future Against Corruption Award. Apply today!

The Azerbaijani Laundromat one year on: has justice been served?

In September last year, a massive leak of bank records from 2012 to 2014 showed that the ruling elite of Azerbaijan ran a $3 billion slush fund and an international money laundering scheme. One year on, has enough been done to hold those involved to account?

Right to information: knowledge is power

The right to information is vital for preventing corruption. When citizens can access key facts and data from governments, it is more difficult to hide abuses of power and other illegal activities - governments can be held accountable.

Paradise lost among Maldives dodgy land deals

Should tourists run for cover as a storm of corruption allegations sweeps across the Maldives?

Foreign bribery rages unchecked in over half of global trade

There are many losers and few winners when companies bribe foreign public officials to win lucrative overseas contracts. In prioritising profits over principles, governments in most major exporting countries fail to prosecute companies flouting laws criminalising foreign bribery.

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media