Deadlock on anti-corruption framework must end

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



The prolonged stalemate over an effective mechanism to review the implementation of anti-corruption commitments must come to an end if victims of corruption around the world are to obtain justice, according to Transparency International (TI). The call on governments party to the UN Convention against Corruption - the only global legal framework to prevent and criminalise corruption - was issued by close to 100 civil society organisations from around the world during TI’s annual membership meeting.

“These governments should embrace thorough and transparent reviews, which are the only way to ensure that each country’s anti-corruption efforts are judged equally and fairly,” said Huguette Labelle, Chair, Transparency International. States party to the UNCAC will meet in Doha in November to consider the review mechanism.

Without a way to effectively confirm whether states are acting against corruption, the credibility of UNCAC would be badly impaired. A review mechanism is essential to promote country implementation of the convention's requirements. These include the criminalisation of a wide range of acts including bribery, embezzlement of public funds, money-laundering and obstruction of justice. When appropriate legislation is passed and monitored, the essential building blocks for more accountable states are set.

The global coalition’s meeting also called for the recently elected members of the German parliament to swiftly adjust the country’s criminal code regarding the bribery of parliamentarians to remove the main obstacle to Germany's outstanding ratification of UNCAC.

The protection of honest and engaged individuals who report wrongdoing in public and private institutions, often at great personal risk, was also a priority at the TI meeting. Governments must develop dedicated legislation or implement clear and effective measures in existing legal frameworks, while public institutions, companies and non-profit organisations should establish programmes to protect whistleblowers against retaliation. “Whistleblowers must be protected. They are advancing accountability by exposing large webs of corruption, nepotism and conflicts of interest, among other practices that hurt business and undermine trust in the public sector,” said Labelle.

###

Transparency International is the civil society organisation leading the fight against corruption

Note to Editors: The UN Convention against Corruption (UNCAC) is the most comprehensive global legal framework for combating corruption. It is a binding agreement ratified by 141 states on standards and requirements for preventing, detecting, investigating and sanctioning corruption. The adoption of an effective review mechanism at the upcoming Conference of States Parties is essential for the success of the UNCAC. Article 33 of UNCAC addresses the protection of whistleblowers.


For any press enquiries please contact

Gypsy Guillén Kaiser
T: +49 30 34 38 20662
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Supplementary downloads

Latest

Support Transparency International

Former vice-president on trial: a watershed moment for Portugal and Angola

Manuel Vicente is the former head of the all-powerful Angolan state oil company Sonangol and was, until a few months ago, the vice-president of Angola. Now he is the main target of a high-profile corruption case in Lisbon.

The theme for the 18th edition of the International Anti-Corruption Conference (IACC) is announced

Building on the priorities set out in the Panama Declaration, the 18th IACC in Denmark from 22 to 24 October 2018 will move the pledge of acting together now to concrete action.

A new home for our corruption research

Transparency International is excited to announce the launch of the Knowledge Hub, a dedicated online space for our research.

Pardon me? Presidential clemency and impunity for grand corruption

Recent events in Brazil and Peru have shone a spotlight on the issue of presidential pardons in cases of grand corruption. Read more to find out the best practices that legislators can use to ensure that pardons are not abused for political purposes.

Stopping Dirty Money: the Global Effective-O-Meter

As of December 2017, global effectiveness at stopping money laundering stands at 32% effectiveness.

Corruption in the USA: The difference a year makes

A new survey by Transparency International shows that the US government has a long way to go to win back citizens’ trust.

Anti-Corruption Day 2017: Empowering citizens’ fight against corruption

The 9 December, is Anti-corruption Day. A key part of Transparency International’s work is to help people hold their governments to account. Have a look at what we've been doing around the world!

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media

Would you like to know more?

Sign up to stay informed about corruption news and our work around the world