Transparency International Canada says Ottawa’s move to strengthen anti-corruption legislation sends a powerful message to the Canadian business community

Issued by Transparency International Canada



Transparency International Canada (TI-Canada) said today it welcomes the amendments tabled by the federal government which, when adopted, will greatly strengthen the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act (CFPOA).

“For many years TI-Canada has been recommending improvements to Canada’s anti-corruption legislation and we are pleased that the government has taken our recommendations and started the process to turn them in to law,” said Janet Keeping, Chair and President of TI-Canada. “These amendments send a powerful message to the Canadian business community.”

TI-Canada, Transparency International and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and  Development have been particularly concerned that Canada lacked the ability in some circumstances to prosecute Canadians or Canadian companies for bribery in other countries. By adding “nationality jurisdiction” the amendments tabled today close this loophole and bring Canada in line with other jurisdictions like the United States, the United Kingdom and Europe.

“Plugging the loopholes and limiting the exceptions previously available will make it easier to achieve successful prosecutions, provided that the Government ensures the RCMP has the necessary resources to enforce the CFPOA,” Keeping added.

“With these new changes, and Canada’s continued commitment to providing resources to investigate and prosecute those who continue to pay bribes, Canada can become a leader in the fight against international corruption.”


For any press enquiries please contact

Janet Keeping, Chair and President
T: 403-283-8085; after 5 p.m. EST: 403-383-1356
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Bronwyn Best
T: 416-488-3939
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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