The week in corruption: 6 stories making the news

The week in corruption: 6 stories making the news

1. Iraq: How corruption helped cause one of Baghdad’s deadliest attacks
The Washington Post

After more than 200 people were killed in a devastating Islamic State bomb attack in the Iraqi capital, Iraqis turned their anger toward a symbol of government corruption and the state’s failure to protect them: fake bomb detectors.

2. Spain: Lionel Messi handed 21-month tax fraud sentence but is unlikely to serve time
The Guardian

Lionel Messi and his father Jorge have been sentenced to 21 months in prison for tax fraud, but the Barcelona forward is not expected to spend any time behind bars.

3. China: China’s devastating floods can be traced back to corruption and overbuilding
Quartz

China is reeling under the country’s most devastating floods in over a decade. Weeklong flooding has killed more than 180 people, affected 32 million people across 26 provinces on the mainland, and led to losses of 50 billion yuan (about $7 billion).

4. Brazil: Eduardo Cunha, chief critic of Brazil's Dilma Rouseff, resigns
CNN

He has been accused of benefiting from a massive bribery scheme involving the state-run oil company Petrobras. The corruption investigation has already brought down some of the country's top political and business leaders.

5. Kenya: Three police officers linked to lawyer Willie Kimani's killing detained pending probe
The Daily Nation

Three police officers arrested over killing of lawyer Willie Kimani, his client and taxi driver will be detained for 14 days pending investigations.

6. US: New SEC anti-corruption rules make it harder for oil companies to bribe foreign countries
Forbes

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) issued landmark transparency rules on June 27 requiring oil, gas and mining companies listed on U.S. stock exchanges to disclose all payments they make to the U.S. and foreign governments.

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