Slovakia: Cities ranked on their transparency

Screen capture of the TI Slovakia open government websiteVisit our Slovak chapter’s Open Local Government ranking website. Compare cities over time, and see how our chapter is working to improve city governance across the country.

Local governments provide many of the services and infrastructure that citizens rely on in their daily lives. When municipal governments are stained by corruption, people suffer.

Two weeks ago Transparency International Slovakia launched its Open Local Government results, an evaluation of 100 largest cities in Slovakia. It is the second time the chapter has assessed the cities across 111 indicators of transparency.

The ranking covers cities that are home to half of the Slovak population. These local governments administer over €3.5 billion each year.

The good news is that 80 out of 100 cities improved in the span of two years, in part an indication of the ranking’s impact and the media pressure it created when first released in 2010.

What’s behind the improvement?

The main reason Slovak cities have improved since the last ranking is the higher quality and amount of information that cities publish on their websites. While in 2010 only a slight majority of cities published minutes from municipal parliament sessions online, this year this information was published by three-fourths of the cities. The number of municipalities publishing tender announcements for public contracts increased similarly.

Meanwhile, the number of cities publishing audio or video recordings of municipal parliamentary sessions has tripled in the past two years – as did the number of cities publishing announcements about allocated grants.

Since the first survey, the quantity of cities requiring codes of ethics for their employees grew from 24 to 36.

How our chapter helps

Transparency International Slovakia has helped push city governments and state-run companies to adopt better, more transparent practices.

One way our chapter helps municipalities improve is through its Transparent Town audit. The chapter identifies gaps and suggests reforms local governments can undertake. The northern Slovak city of Martin offers an example that others can follow. It was given the prestigious UN Public Service Award for its anti-corruption reforms. A year after the start of the project, the first city purchases were carried out by electronic auctions, saving up to quarter of expected expenditures.

The chapter has also ranked Slovakian state-owned companies on their transparency, and set up an open database of public procurement tenders that allows members of the public to see which firms are winning contracts. So far, the database has shown over 30,000 contracts worth more than €22 billion.

Resources

For any press enquiries please contact press@transparency.org

Latest

Support Transparency International

Is Hungary’s assault on the rule of law fuelling corruption?

In June 2018, Hungary’s parliament passed a series of laws that criminalise any individual or group that offers help to an illegal immigrant. The laws continued worrying trends in the public arena that began with the rise to power of the Fidesz party in 2010. What are these trends, and what do they mean for the fight against corruption and the rule of law in Hungary?

Will the G20 deliver on anti-corruption in 2018?

This week, activists from civil society organisations all over the world gathered in Buenos Aires, Argentina for the sixth annual Civil 20 (C20) summit.

Returning Nigerians’ stolen millions

The stakes are high in the planned distribution of $322 million in stolen Nigerian public money.

Three priorities at the Open Government Partnership summit

Transparency International has been at the Open Government Partnership's global summit in Tbilisi, Georgia, pushing for action in three key areas.

Civil society’s crucial role in sustainable development

Key players in the development community are meeting in New York for the main United Nations conference on sustainable development, the High-Level Political Forum (HLPF). Transparency International is there to highlight how corruption obstructs development and report on how effectively countries are tackling this issue.

Comment gagner la lutte contre la corruption en Afrique

Aujourd’hui est la Journée africaine de lutte contre la corruption – une occasion opportunité pour reconnaitre le progrès dans la lutte contre la corruption en Afrique et le travail significatif qui reste encore à accomplir.

How to win the fight against corruption in Africa

African Anti-Corruption Day is an important opportunity to recognise both the progress made in the fight against corruption in Africa and the significant work still left to do.

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media