Slideshow: Inside our hackathon in Rwanda

Slideshow: Inside our hackathon in Rwanda

From 1-2 June 2013 in Kigali, Rwanda, 33 developers worked for 36 hours on tech tools to help solve problems faced by Transparency International chapters in Burundi, Madagascar, Mauritius, Rwanda and Senegal. The Hackathon was hosted by Transparency International jointly with Rwandan tech hub kLab. The Rwanda hackathon followed our first Hacks against Corruption event in Sub-Saharan Africa, which was held in December 2012 in Nairobi, Kenya.

  • Thirty-three Rwandan ICT (Internet and Communication Technology) students and anti-corruption specialists worked together to find practical solutions to the challenges faced by our chapters while fighting corruption.

  • Holy Razafindrandretsa presents Transparency International Madagascar's problem statement. The chapter wanted a tool to help people report corruption anonymously.

  • Saliou Diop from Senegal sought a solution from Rwandan IT experts: a tool serving the fight against corruption in the road transport sector.

  • Ella Ndikumana of our chapter, ABUCO Burundi, explains what her chapter is hoping for from the Rwandan hackers. She wanted a tool to help people living in remote areas access her organisation's advocacy and legal advice centres.

  • Rajen Bablee, from our chapter in Mauritius, was looking for a whistleblowing ICT tool. The hackers gather details on the needs, and then split into small groups to develop solutions.

  • Thirteen groups of hackers worked to provide ICT solutions to our francophone African chapters.

  • The hackers work in an all-night 'sprint' to develop a prototype.

  • When the hacking ends, the developers present their progress to the attendees.

  • Rwanda's Minister of Youth and ICT, Jean Philbert Nsengimana, met the developers during the long night of hacking and chaired the award ceremony along with our Rwandan chapter's Chair, Marie-Immaculee Ingabire.

  • Third Prize Winners

    Gilbert Ndayisenga, Joseph Manzi and Patrick Niyonsaba worked on a solution to a problem statement from Burundi. Their solution allows people to report cases of bad service delivery and give further details by filling out a questionnaire. Government offices will receive information about cases concerning their institutions and departments (but will not be able to ascertain the identity of the person behind the report).

  • Second Prize Winners

    Sabine Dukuze and Jeanne Yamfashije worked on a tool to solve a problem statement from Rwanda. The La Loupe Rwanda tool lets people rate the service quality of institutions and departments through SMS, green line and a touch screen tool. The goal is to generate reports for all services provided by public sector institutions.

  • First Prize Winners

    Pascal Tuyishime, Christa Munezero and Jean Claude Mugenzi built the NOZA Rwanda web- and SMS-based application allowing people to anonymously report problems with service delivery by public agencies.

 

All images by Transparency International / Saran Koly

For any press enquiries please contact press@transparency.org

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