Shopping discounts for Cambodians against corruption

Shopping discounts for Cambodians against corruption

More than 8,000 people in Cambodia are now enjoying discounts in shops across the capital Phnom Penh thanks to their new Anti-Corruption Card, which Transparency International Cambodia is offering to all those who sign their Declaration against Corruption.    

The card, which entitles holders to savings of up to 60 per cent at a wide variety of shops in the city, is being used by Transparency International Cambodia as a way to bring together individuals from all ages and backgrounds as well as business in the collective fight against corruption. 

By signing the Declaration against Corruption, people commit to a set of principles, including not paying bribes and speaking out against corruption.

Cafés, computer shops and dentists are among the nearly 100 businesses in Phnom Penh to join the initiative so far and Transparency International Cambodia has plans to expand it across the country.

The Anti-Corruption Card was conceived as a tool to encourage and empower citizens, especially young ones, as well as businesses, to join hands and become part of vibrant movement to curtail corruption.”

– Kol Preap, Executive Director at Transparency International Cambodia.

Young people driving change

As more than 65 per cent of Cambodians are under the age of 30, Transparency International Cambodia chose to launch the card at a local university in Phnom Penh. The event attracted more than 300 students and partners from other NGOs, business and the media.

"It is great to have joined this event to talk about how to tackle corruption, which is very important. If Cambodia had no corruption or if people knew what to do to fight against it, there would be more development in our country,” said student Neng Pov, 22, at the launch.

Declaration against Corruption

Transparency International’s Declaration against Corruption has been signed by people around the world, from Greenland and Turkey to Yemen.

For any press enquiries please contact press@transparency.org

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