Putting corruption out of business

Putting corruption out of business

Update, 31 October 2012

Today we close out the 'Putting corruption out of business' survey series by releasing the complete data set along with the last of our seven interactive graphics.

We've also prepared a brief survey to help us learn about your use of the data and how we can enhance our business survey in the future. It takes two minutes, and can be reached by clicking here. We appreciate your feedback and responses!

Putting corruption out of business: a global survey

When companies bribe to win contracts, grease the wheels of bureaucracy, or get around rules, they damage not only their competitors, but also the societies in which they operate.

Bribery can lead to inferior firms winning business over better rivals, which can have real-world impacts across many sectors – from construction and utilities to telecommunications and financial services. Businesspeople who offer bribes also influence policy makers and procurement processes, undermining effective government and fair competition in the marketplace. This is instead of private sector policies, decisions and transactions being based on merit and achieving outcomes that are optimal for society.

To learn more about the way businesspeople perceive the impact of corruption on their work, Transparency International surveyed 3,000 businesspeople in 30 countries. The results present a unique snapshot of business views on corruption from around the world.

Click to view the infographic

We invite you to delve into the results with our new interactive tool.

Each week for the next four weeks we will be releasing the results of our survey in this tool. You can compare the data across countries, sectors, gender of respondent and more.

What trends do you see in the data? Leave a comment below and let us know what you think.

In a blog post announcing the release of the results, Transparency International Research Manager Deborah Hardoon notes:

We must explore these results with an appreciation for the varying contexts and perceptions of the respondents. Respondents have access to different levels of information about the way public contracts are given out. They work in environments where the level of media activity exposing corruption cases can vary."

Why business corruption matters

In our globalised world, business, trade and growth play central roles in our societies. The effects of corruption in business are felt by all citizens. People want to start and grow businesses with integrity, free of the manipulating effects of bribery and other forms of graft.

Indeed, stopping corruption in the private sector is of critical importance if we are to stop corruption at the local, national and international level. Governments and international actors have an important role to play in creating an environment that does not tolerate corruption and effectively prosecutes those that are guilty. But business and businesspeople can also do much to improve their transparency, protect whistleblowers and set the highest standards of integrity amongst their workforces.

More about the survey

Transparency International carried out a survey of businesspeople in 30 diverse countries around the world. The survey was conducted from May-July 2011 and asked businesspeople not just for their views on bribery and corruption, but also on what works to stop corruption in the private sector and what the business community can do to put corruption out of business. Other questions from this survey asked for perceptions of the likelihood of companies from other countries to pay bribes when doing business in the country being surveyed and these results were used to construct the Bribe Payers Index 2011. For more information on the methdology of the survey, download our explanatory Excel file or the complete data set.

This survey complements other corruption-related research from Transparency International, including:

We encourage you to have a look at the data and tell us what you think.

 

For any press enquiries please contact press@transparency.org

Latest

Support Transparency International

Apply Now for Transparency International School on Integrity!

Apply today for the Transparency School 2018 and spend an insightful week with anti-corruption enthusiasts from all over the world!

While the G20 drags its feet, the corrupt continue to benefit from anonymous company ownership

The corrupt don’t like paper trails, they like secrecy. What better way to hide corrupt activity than with a secret company or trust as a front? You can anonymously open bank accounts, make transfers and launder dirty money. If the company is not registered in your name, it can't always be traced back to you.

Urging leaders to act against corruption in the Americas

The hot topic at the 2018 Summit of the Americas is how governments can combat corruption at the highest levels across North and South America.

The impact of land corruption on women: insights from Africa

As part of International Women’s Day, Transparency International is launching the Women, Land and Corruption resource book. This is a collection of unique articles and research findings that describe and analyse the prevalence of land corruption in Africa – and its disproportionate effect on women – presented together with innovative responses from organisations across the continent.

Passport dealers of Europe: navigating the Golden Visa market

Coast or mountains? Real estate or business investment? Want your money back in five years? If you're rich, there are an array of options for European ‘Golden Visas’ at your fingertips, each granting EU residence or citizenship rights.

How the G20 can make state-owned enterprises champions of integrity

For the first time in its presidency of the G20, Argentina is hosting country representatives from across the globe to address the best ways of curtailing corruption and promoting integrity in state-owned enterprises (SOEs).

Europe and Central Asia: More civil engagement needed (Part II)

As follow-up to the regional analysis of Eastern Europe and Central Asia, additional examples from Albania, Kosovo and Georgia highlight the need for more progress in anti-corruption efforts in these countries and across the region.

Lutte contre la corruption en Afrique: Du bon et du moins bon

La publication de la dernière édition de l’Indice de perception de la corruption (IPC) offre un bon point de repère pour situer les efforts de lutte contre la corruption que l’Union africaine (UA) poursuivra tout au long de 2018

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media

Would you like to know more?

Sign up to stay informed about corruption news and our work around the world