Our new global talk series on climate finance integrity

From Mexico City to Johannesburg to Bangkok, this year we are holding a series of talks across the globe on how to ensure that investment in the response to climate change really works, and is not undercut by corruption. Our global climate team has been analysing risks in the climate sector, and now we’re hoping to bring the right people to the table to discuss practical ways of overcoming them.

A number of these events will take place in Berlin – home to some of the most progressive environmental policy of recent years and its architects, one of the world’s largest contributors to climate finance, and a train’s ride away from the UN Climate Change Convention secretariat. The Berlin Climate Finance Integrity Talks series was designed to cut across sectors and disciplines and provide a non-politicised forum for climate policy-makers and practitioners to come together to jointly craft solutions to the problems that are already arising or anticipated.

The purpose of this event series is to mete out some practical yet ambitious solutions to the challenges we face. Challenges to ensure that those with entrusted power for deciding how much and for whom climate money should be spent are accountable for their decisions. Challenges to ensure that public money is not wasted, mismanaged or disappearing into offshore bank accounts. Challenges to ensure that every penny in already stretched public purses is spent with integrity and achieves genuine results toward avoiding serious climate change.”

– Opening address by Lisa Elges, Team Leader of our Climate Finance Integrity Programme

Watch excerpts from the first talk in our Berlin series here

Focus of the series

These are just some of the questions that our talk series is touching upon. The latest in the series was held in Berlin from 9-10 September, dedicated to exploring options for strengthening citizen participation in climate project design and monitoring, as well as the various models for supportive complaints mechanisms for when things go wrong.

Panel discussion in Berlin

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