Our new global talk series on climate finance integrity

From Mexico City to Johannesburg to Bangkok, this year we are holding a series of talks across the globe on how to ensure that investment in the response to climate change really works, and is not undercut by corruption. Our global climate team has been analysing risks in the climate sector, and now we’re hoping to bring the right people to the table to discuss practical ways of overcoming them.

A number of these events will take place in Berlin – home to some of the most progressive environmental policy of recent years and its architects, one of the world’s largest contributors to climate finance, and a train’s ride away from the UN Climate Change Convention secretariat. The Berlin Climate Finance Integrity Talks series was designed to cut across sectors and disciplines and provide a non-politicised forum for climate policy-makers and practitioners to come together to jointly craft solutions to the problems that are already arising or anticipated.

The purpose of this event series is to mete out some practical yet ambitious solutions to the challenges we face. Challenges to ensure that those with entrusted power for deciding how much and for whom climate money should be spent are accountable for their decisions. Challenges to ensure that public money is not wasted, mismanaged or disappearing into offshore bank accounts. Challenges to ensure that every penny in already stretched public purses is spent with integrity and achieves genuine results toward avoiding serious climate change.”

– Opening address by Lisa Elges, Team Leader of our Climate Finance Integrity Programme

Watch excerpts from the first talk in our Berlin series here

Focus of the series

These are just some of the questions that our talk series is touching upon. The latest in the series was held in Berlin from 9-10 September, dedicated to exploring options for strengthening citizen participation in climate project design and monitoring, as well as the various models for supportive complaints mechanisms for when things go wrong.

Panel discussion in Berlin

Resources

For any press enquiries please contact press@transparency.org

Latest

Support Transparency International

Stopping Dirty Money: the Global Effective-O-Meter

As of December 2017, global effectiveness at stopping money laundering stands at 32% effectiveness.

Corruption in the USA: The difference a year makes

A new survey by Transparency International shows that the US government has a long way to go to win back citizens’ trust.

Anti-Corruption Day 2017: Empowering citizens’ fight against corruption

The 9 December, is Anti-corruption Day. A key part of Transparency International’s work is to help people hold their governments to account. Have a look at what we've been doing around the world!

Digital Award for Transparency: Honouring digital initiatives to fight corruption

The Digital Award for Transparency awards individuals and civil society organisations who have developed digital technology tools used to fight corruption. The award aims at strengthening and promoting existing initiatives that promote good governance through three categories: Open Data, Citizen Engagement and Anti-Corruption Tools.

Unearthing corruption risks in mining approvals

From resource-rich West Africans nations, to the mining giants of the Pacific and North America, every time a government signs a deal to allow mining of its natural resources there are corruption risks – no matter where that country is.

TI launches Clean Contracting Manifesto, calls for G20 adoption

Governments spend huge sums of money via public procurement every year yet the concentration of money, government discretion and corporate influence in providing these vital good and services makes it particularly vulnerable to corruption. Transparency International has launched a Clean Contracting Manifesto to ensure that the whole lifecycle of public procurement is transparent, accountable, efficient and in the public interest.

Preventing corruption in state-owned enterprises

In many countries public services such as energy, water, transportation and health care are provided by enterprises either controlled or partly-owned by the government. These state-owned enterprises (SOEs) can be vulnerable to corruption. Transparency International researched ways SOEs can combat corruption - check it out here!

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media

Would you like to know more?

Sign up to stay informed about corruption news and our work around the world