Investigative journalism: uncovering corruption

Investigative journalism: uncovering corruption

One World Media Corruption Reporting Award

For the third year Transparency International is sponsoring the One World Media Corruption Reporting Award.

The media plays a crucial role in providing citizens with information that enables them to stand up to and fight the corrupt. This takes courage and determination from both the reporters and the people who tell stories, sometimes at great personal risk.

The award seeks to honour journalists who bring the abuses of entrusted power to light – because only when corruption is uncovered can it be tackled.

ENTER NOW: One World Media Corruption Reporting Award

The 2016 Awards are NOW OPEN for entries, with a closing deadline of 4 February 2016.

Click here to see how to enter and here to see all this year's categories, which include the Transparency International Corruption Reporting Award.

The award is open to all broadcast, online and print media that deal with any aspect of corruption, including investigative reports and features that show the effects of corruption on individuals or society.

Corruption is defined as the abuse of entrusted power for private gain, including everything from grand corruption to petty bribery.

2015 Winners

The winner of the 2015 Corruption Reporting Award was the documentary Virunga, directed by Orlando von Einsiede, that told the story of a small group of dedicated conservationists and park officials in the Democratic Republic of Congo who are fighting both militias and corruption to save Virunga National Park – its wildlife and local communities – from commercial exploitation.
Overall there were more than 30 entries. The runners-up for the 2015 award were:

Transparency International is already a co-sponsor of the Latin American Investigative Journalism Award with Instituto Prensa y Sociedad (Press and Society Institute, IPYS). The winner of the 2015 award, went to The White House of Enrique Peña Nieto, an investigation by Daniel Lizarraga, Rafael Cabrera, Irving Huerta, Sebastian Barragan, and Carmen Aristegui from Aristegui Noticias (Mexico). The reporters looked into the US$7 million mansion that was an undeclared donation to the Mexico’s President Enrique Peña Nieto from a contractor who was favoured with public contracts.

One World Media Awards are now in their 28th year. They reward “the most outstanding coverage of the developing world and recognise the unique role of journalists and filmmakers in increasing cultural understanding and promoting fairness and justice worldwide”. The Corruption Reporting Award received more than 30 entries, of which three were shortlisted. The jury for the award is independent and selected and managed by One World Media. The 2016 award will be presented in London in May.

For any press enquiries please contact press@transparency.org

Latest

Support Transparency International

Civil society’s crucial role in sustainable development

Key players in the development community are meeting in New York for the main United Nations conference on sustainable development, the High-Level Political Forum (HLPF). Transparency International is there to highlight how corruption obstructs development and report on how effectively countries are tackling this issue.

Comment gagner la lutte contre la corruption en Afrique

Aujourd’hui est la Journée africaine de lutte contre la corruption – une occasion opportunité pour reconnaitre le progrès dans la lutte contre la corruption en Afrique et le travail significatif qui reste encore à accomplir.

How to win the fight against corruption in Africa

African Anti-Corruption Day is an important opportunity to recognise both the progress made in the fight against corruption in Africa and the significant work still left to do.

Increasing accountability and safeguarding billions in climate finance

In December 2015, governments from around the world came together to sign the Paris Agreement, agreeing to tackle climate change and keep global warming under two degrees centigrade. They committed to spend US$100 billion annually by 2020 to help developing countries reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and protect themselves against the potentially devastating effects of climate change.

After Gürtel, what next for Spain’s struggle with political corruption?

At the start of June, the Spanish parliament voted to oust Prime Minister Rajoy after his political party was embroiled in the biggest corruption scandal in Spain’s democratic history. At this critical juncture in Spain’s struggle with political corruption, Transparency International urges all parties to join forces against impunity and support anti-corruption efforts in public life.

Risk of impunity increases with outcome of Portuguese-Angolan corruption trial

A verdict last week by the Lisbon Court of Appeals in the trial of former Angolan vice president Manuel Vicente has disappointed hopes for a triumph of legal due process over politics and impunity. It also has worrying implications for the independence of Portugal’s judiciary.

The UK just made it harder for the corrupt to hide their wealth offshore

If counted together, the United Kingdom and its Overseas Territories and Crown dependencies would rank worst in the world for financial secrecy. Fortunately, this could soon change.

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media