Global grassroots campaign against corruption reaches over three million people

Global grassroots campaign against corruption reaches over three million people

Today's launch of the Corruption Perceptions Index 2012 shows us that governments have a long way to go to be more transparent and accountable to their citizens. While policymakers play a crucial role in ending corruption, we as citizens also have a voice.

And what a voice we have had this past year! Transparency International's campaign "Time to Wake Up" is running in 17 countries across Latin America, Asia, Africa and Europe, reaching over three million people. From rallies to animated video contests, to public debates and petitions, the Time to Wake Up campaign has made a real splash.

Here's just a small selection of some innovative and exciting campaigning from Transparency International chapters around the world:

In the Dominican Republic, the Time to Wake Up campaign has featured in large national demonstrations in the autumn of 2012. Following a major public advertising campaign, the chapter will hold a rally in the capital city on International Anti-Corruption Day, December 9.

In Chinese Taipei, the chapter worked with the local school district to produce 10 animated videos about different forms of corruption and how to stop it. The videos are shown throughout the school year to over 100,000 children.

In Hungary, the chapter held a huge water fight at a popular summer music festival, to symbolize waking up to the problem of corruption. In the autumn the chapter hosted a Corruption Thriller Film Festival and on December 7, for International Anti-Corruption Day, the chapter will hold an anti-corruption festival that includes a workshop, a mobile app contest and a live concert.

In Lebanon, the chapter has been running a massive public advertising campaign using the Time to Wake Up slogan and calling on Lebanese citizens to sign a petition calling for the government to sign the United Nations Convention against Corruption. At an event on December 9 the Lebanese Transparency Association will present the petition, currently with approximately 30,000 signatures, and call for more people to sign.

For any press enquiries please contact press@transparency.org

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