Global grassroots campaign against corruption reaches over three million people

Global grassroots campaign against corruption reaches over three million people

Today's launch of the Corruption Perceptions Index 2012 shows us that governments have a long way to go to be more transparent and accountable to their citizens. While policymakers play a crucial role in ending corruption, we as citizens also have a voice.

And what a voice we have had this past year! Transparency International's campaign "Time to Wake Up" is running in 17 countries across Latin America, Asia, Africa and Europe, reaching over three million people. From rallies to animated video contests, to public debates and petitions, the Time to Wake Up campaign has made a real splash.

Here's just a small selection of some innovative and exciting campaigning from Transparency International chapters around the world:

In the Dominican Republic, the Time to Wake Up campaign has featured in large national demonstrations in the autumn of 2012. Following a major public advertising campaign, the chapter will hold a rally in the capital city on International Anti-Corruption Day, December 9.

In Chinese Taipei, the chapter worked with the local school district to produce 10 animated videos about different forms of corruption and how to stop it. The videos are shown throughout the school year to over 100,000 children.

In Hungary, the chapter held a huge water fight at a popular summer music festival, to symbolize waking up to the problem of corruption. In the autumn the chapter hosted a Corruption Thriller Film Festival and on December 7, for International Anti-Corruption Day, the chapter will hold an anti-corruption festival that includes a workshop, a mobile app contest and a live concert.

In Lebanon, the chapter has been running a massive public advertising campaign using the Time to Wake Up slogan and calling on Lebanese citizens to sign a petition calling for the government to sign the United Nations Convention against Corruption. At an event on December 9 the Lebanese Transparency Association will present the petition, currently with approximately 30,000 signatures, and call for more people to sign.

For any press enquiries please contact press@transparency.org

Latest

Support Transparency International

Anti-Corruption Award 2018 - Nominations Open!

Our Anti-Corruption Award recognises the courage and determination of the many individuals and organisations fighting corruption around the world.

Nominate an anti-corruption hero today! 

After Gürtel, what next for Spain’s struggle with political corruption?

At the start of June, the Spanish parliament voted to oust Prime Minister Rajoy after his political party was embroiled in the biggest corruption scandal in Spain’s democratic history. At this critical juncture in Spain’s struggle with political corruption, Transparency International urges all parties to join forces against impunity and support anti-corruption efforts in public life.

Risk of impunity increases with outcome of Portuguese-Angolan corruption trial

A verdict last week by the Lisbon Court of Appeals in the trial of former Angolan vice president Manuel Vicente has disappointed hopes for a triumph of legal due process over politics and impunity. It also has worrying implications for the independence of Portugal’s judiciary.

The UK just made it harder for the corrupt to hide their wealth offshore

If counted together, the United Kingdom and its Overseas Territories and Crown dependencies would rank worst in the world for financial secrecy. Fortunately, this could soon change.

The new IMF anti-corruption framework: 3 things we’ll be looking for a year from now

Last Sunday, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) unveiled its long-awaited framework for “enhanced” engagement with countries on corruption and governance issues. Here are three aspects we at Transparency International will be looking at closely in coming months as the new policy is rolled out.

While the G20 drags its feet, the corrupt continue to benefit from anonymous company ownership

The corrupt don’t like paper trails, they like secrecy. What better way to hide corrupt activity than with a secret company or trust as a front? You can anonymously open bank accounts, make transfers and launder dirty money. If the company is not registered in your name, it can't always be traced back to you.

Urging leaders to act against corruption in the Americas

The hot topic at the 2018 Summit of the Americas is how governments can combat corruption at the highest levels across North and South America.

The impact of land corruption on women: insights from Africa

As part of International Women’s Day, Transparency International is launching the Women, Land and Corruption resource book. This is a collection of unique articles and research findings that describe and analyse the prevalence of land corruption in Africa – and its disproportionate effect on women – presented together with innovative responses from organisations across the continent.

Social Media

Follow us on Social Media