Empowering youth: Anti-corruption kit for young activists

Empowering youth: Anti-corruption kit for young activists

Cover of anti-corruption kit for young activists

Today is International Youth Day, a day for celebrating young people in society and their power to shape the world around them.

When it comes to fighting corruption, many young people are already making a big difference to the communities and countries they live in. But for those just starting out, the prospect of kick-starting a campaign, running a hackathon or planning a protest can be daunting.

That’s why we created our new anti-corruption kit – offering 15 ideas for young activists, with step-by-step guidance on how to turn a plan into action. 

Here are five ways young leaders in our movement are putting these tools into practice:

Follow the money – Brazil

Governments have vast sums of public money at their disposal and this can pose a serious corruption risk. By keeping tabs on government expenditure, young people can help shed light on how their country’s taxes are being spent and expose any abuses. Click here to find out more.

In Brazil, we helped a group of young villagers form an NGO of their own to monitor local government spending on water, education, health and infrastructure.

 

Tech solutions – Rwanda

The world is becoming more reliant on technology every day, and so too is the fight against corruption. Tech-savvy young people can help communities document their cases of corruption by developing reporting platforms via the web, hotlines or mobile apps. Click here to find out more.

At our hackathon in Rwanda, 33 local students and anti-corruption specialists came together to find practical tech-based solutions to the challenges some of our African chapters face in the anti-corruption field.

 

Comics and cartoons – Bangladesh

Comics are a powerful way of raising awareness about anti-corruption among young children, helping get complex messages across in a medium they can understand. Through a combination of images and text, comics can also help spark debate in the societies depicted – and be produced by those who have little or no access to advanced production methods. Click here to find out more.

In Bangladesh earlier this year, we hosted an exhibition of anti-corruption cartoons at a local school to promote integrity among young students.

 

Theatre and drama – Tunisia

Young people can get creative by taking their anti-corruption drive to the stage. Music, drama, poetry or dance can be used to empower citizens about societal forces which affect their lives as well as help them improve their own communities. Click here to find out more.

In Tunisia, we recently hosted a poetry slam and stand-up comedy session to mobilise young people around the upcoming elections and encourage them to register to vote.

 

Integrity camps – Lithuania

By hosting an integrity camp, young activists can inject fun into fighting corruption. Such events bring school or university peers together in an unconventional way to take part in outdoor activities and find lasting anti-corruption solutions. Click here to find out more.

In Lithuania, about 130 young anti-corruption activists from across the globe took part in our fifth School on Integrity, which equipped young leaders with skills to stand against corruption in their countries.

 

Are you – or someone you know – a young corruption fighter? Tell us what you are working on in the comments section below!

 

 

Editor's note: This article was revised on 21 August 2014 to correct the number of students who attended the fifth School on Integrity in Lithuania.

 

For any press enquiries please contact press@transparency.org

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