Corruption risks: how does your country measure up?

Corruption risks: how does your country measure up?

What do Ethiopia, Greece, and the Turks and Caicos have in common? Answer: they’ve all undergone our in-depth integrity assessments – unique projects that examine a country’s key actors, from the media to parliament to the judiciary, looking for the weaknesses and loopholes that allow corruption to creep in.

The idea is two-fold. First: to end corruption, you need all of a country’s key institutions working to their full potential. Whether it’s the independence of the judiciary or a lack of regulation on lobbying, problems in one sector make abuses more likely across the board. Second: effective solutions are those everyone can stand behind. When there’s not real commitment from across society, even the strongest measures can have little impact.

Looking at each major institution in turn, and produced in consultation with those who work at the heart of them, our national assessments are designed to meet both needs. Creating a dialogue with those who are pivotal to driving change, the assessments not only provide a comprehensive analysis of corruption risks, they also offer credible solutions that work in practice.

In 2012, as economic crisis and political scandals dogged Europe, we examined 25 countries and 800 institutions for the largest-ever analysis of the continent’s corruption risks. Exposing worrying threats at the intersection of money and politics, we prompted governments to take action on a range of issues from organised crime to party financing.

To date, we’ve put the spotlight on more than 100 countries and territories worldwide. And there’s more coming soon. Our researchers are currently at work in Bangladesh, Cambodia, the Maldives, Nepal, New Zealand, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Vanuatu and Vietnam – as well as countries in the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and Africa.

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