Capturing Corruption: global photo competition

Capturing Corruption: global photo competition

Images have the power to bring about change. They evoke emotion and deliver information that can spur people to action. This is true in the fight against corruption, but capturing the devastating effect that corruption has on people’s lives is hard.

That’s why Transparency International, the Thomson Reuters Foundation and the International Anti-Corruption Conference are sponsoring Capturing Corruption, a photography competition that is looking for imaginative and powerful images that show the corrosive effects of corruption.

Capturing Corruption is open to anyone over the age of 18. It will be judged in two categories for photographers aged 18 to 30 years old and for those 31 years of age and over.

Image of Jesse Garcia

Jesse Garcia award

The award for the 18 to 30 year old age group will be given in remembrance of Jesse Garcia who was a filmmaker and photographer at Transparency International. Jesse was a firm believer in the power of photos and videos in fighting corruption. Sadly, he passed away in 2013, but his work continues to live on.

What you can win

The winners of both categories will have the chance to take part in an all-expenses paid photojournalism workshop held by the Thomson Reuters Foundation and also will get to travel to the 16th International Anti-Corruption Conference in Malaysia from 2 to 4 September 2015.

Details for the photojournalism workshops have yet to be decided, but there is more than one date available.

There are also cash prizes for runners up and 20 of the top photographs will be published on both the Transparency International website and the Thomson Reuters website.

For information on how to enter, go to our competition page. The deadline is 12 June.

Get inspired

In 2013, to coincide with the 20th anniversary of Transparency International we asked young photographers to show us the effects of corruption on their world. See the winning entries: https://www.transparency.org/getinvolved/2013photowinners

Image of man with fish

For any press enquiries please contact press@transparency.org

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