Calling all Southern African land and anti-corruption activists!

Calling all Southern African land and anti-corruption activists!

Across Africa, one in every two people needing to access land-related services is affected by corruption. This could be a bribe demanded by a housing official, a dodgy business deal that forces local communities off their land, or a fraud scheme by bogus property developers. This kind of corruption plays out in the public and private sectors and affects rural and urban citizens alike.

For young people, land-related corruption can sap entrepreneurial spirit and restrict access to employment, forcing migration to overcrowded urban centres where competition for jobs is even greater.

To help change this situation, Transparency International has teamed up with Ashoka and the International Anti-Corruption Conference to launch the first ChangemakerXchange in Southern Africa from 2 – 5 October in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Do you have an innovative land-related anti-corruption project idea? Apply for our ChangemakerXchange today.

Eligibility:

Think you’ve got what it takes? Enter now: http://bit.ly/29J6YoX

Applications close at 5pm SAST on 12 August 2016.

Please read through the step by step instructions on how to apply, FAQs, tips and resources here.

We will cover the expenses for your economy travel, visa, meals, and four nights of accommodation from 2 - 5 October 2016 in Johannesburg, South Africa.

In addition to networking and project collaboration opportunities during these three days, participants will receive mentoring by established social entrepreneurs, as well as international anti-corruption experts and land activists.

You will also become part of a community that continues to work together long after the event.

An international panel of judges will assess each idea to come out of the summit and the participants/teams with the strongest collaboration-based submissions will get seed grants of between €1,500 and €2,000 to support the implementation of their new land-related anti-corruption project.

Also up for grabs is a trip to Panama from 1–4 December 2016 to participate in the 17th International Anti-Corruption Conference. More details to come.

Any questions? Please contact Amy Badiani (abadiani@ashoka.org) or Nicky Rehbock (nickyr@corruptionwatch.org.za)

Good luck!

For any press enquiries please contact press@transparency.org

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